Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 25–32 of 106 results

  • Campanula portenschlagiana Dalmatian bellflower Z 4-8

    Purple, upfacing bells for months in mid to late summer

    $8.75/pot

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    Purple, upfacing bells for months in mid to late summer

    Size: 4-6” x 20”
    Care: full sun-part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Yugoslavia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. Top rated for ornamental traits and landscape performance by the Chicago Botanic Garden & Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick.

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.”  In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers.” This species named for one of its discoverers, Franz Edler von Portenschlag-Ledermayer (1772-1822). 1st described inSystema Vegetabilium 5: 93 in 1819.  Listed in Sanders’ Flower Garden in 1913.

  • Campanula poscharskyana Adriatic bellflower Z 3-8

    Lilac colored star-shaped blooms from summer through fall

    $8.75/pot

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    Lilac colored star-shaped blooms from summer through fall. Grow in the front of the garden, as a groundcover or in rock gardens.

    Size: 6" X 24"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Mountains of Eastern Europe
    Awards: Top rated by the Chicago Botanic Garden. Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers.” Collected before 1822. Named for 19th century German plantsman, Gustav Poscharsky.

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.75/pot

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    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Chasmanthium latifolium Northern Sea oats Z 5-9

    Graceful, pendulous oat-like spikes

    $6.95/bareroot

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    In August – December Northern sea oats bear pendulous panicles of oat-like spikelets, emerging green and turning bronze. They hang on all winter.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: full sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Eastern U.S., New Jersey to Texas
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced by Michaux (1746-1802) extraordinary French plant hunter, who searched much of eastern No. America for plants. Indians ate the seeds for food. Used ornamentally since Victorian times for fresh and dried arrangements.

  • Clematis integrifolia Z 3-7

    Summer, real true blue and sometimes white, pendant flowers measuring 2" across

    $14.95/bareroot

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    Summer into fall, real true blue and sometimes white,  pendant flowers measuring 2″ across.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: Sun to part shade well-drained soil. Prune to near ground in early spring.
    Native: Central Europe

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant.  It’s not really a vine, it only gets 2′ tall, maybe 3′ and it doesn’t climb, but you can prop it up with a trellis or let it trail for a groundcover.  But it’s a Clematis and one of the best – blue most of the summer into fall & you can’t beat that. This species collected in Hungary by 1573.  English herbalist Gerard grew this plant by the late 1590’s.

  • Clematis stans Japanese clematis Z 4-8

    soulful blue starry nodding bells

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant, smelling of sweet violets, soulful blue starry nodding bells with petals that flip up at the ends (recurved) Blooms August – September.  Ships only in  spring

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan

    Stans means “upright” as this is a bush, rather than a vine. (OK, we’ve put this in the vine category and it’s not a vine.  But most people think of Clematis as vines and we didn’t want you to miss it.) In Japan called “Kusa-botan.” Collected by Ernest Henry ‘Chinese’ Wilson before 1910.

  • Clematis tangutica Russian virgin bower Z 4-9

    Small yellow flowers bloom for months

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Small yellow flowers bloom for months, from July to September, then turn into ornamental spidery seed heads.

    Size: 15-20’ x 6-10’
    Care: Sun - part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Prune close to the ground in spring.
    Native: NW China and Turkestan

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from klema meaning “climbing plant.”  Sixteenth century English herbalist John Gerard called Clematis “traveler’s joy” because of the joy given to travelers by the beauty of the flowers.  This species, C. tangutica introduced to western cultivation in 1898 when it was sent to Kew Gardens from St. Petersburg, Russia, after its discovery in Tibet.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Clematis ternifolia Sweet Autumn clematis Z 4-8

    Fragrant, small white blossoms smother this vigorous vine

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant, small white blossoms smother this vigorous vine in September and October.

    Can not ship to: Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

    Size: 15-20’ x 6-10’
    Care: Sun moist well-drained soil mulched. Flowers on current year’s wood. Cut back in early spring to 6-8” above the soil.
    Native: Japan

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant.  In 1877 seeds of this vine sent from Russia to the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, then distributed to nurseries throughout America.