Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 17–24 of 106 results

  • Astilbe andresii ‘Amethyst’ Z 5-8

    pink plumes flowering in July, with oxblood tinged foliage

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Three foot tall pink plumes flowering in July, with oxblood tinged foliage

    Size: 36"x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade, moist soil essential. Immune walnut toxicity
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Astilbe is Greek from a meaning “without” and stilbe meaning “lustre” referring to the fact that the leaves are not shiny.  Early hybrid by George Arends, nurseryman from Ronsdorf, Gemany (1862-1952).

  • Astilbe andresii ‘Fanal’ Z 4-8

    Marlboro red plumes in June

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Striking Marlboro red plumes in June

    Size: 24"x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade, moist soil. Immune walnut toxicity
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Astilbe is Greek from a meaning “without” and stilbe meaning “lustre” referring to the fact that the leaves are not shiny.  Cross of A. japonica and A. davidii made by Arends, nurseryman from Ronsdorf, Gemany (1862-1952), in 1930.

  • Astilbe chinensis

    Pink plumes in mid-summer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pink plumes in mid-summer

    Size: 24” x 24” spreads
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, more tolerant of drier soil than modern ones. Immune to walnut toxicity.
    Native: Siberia, China, Korea

    Use in  borders or woodland gardens,  for a cut flower or leave it stand for winter interest.   Astilbe is Greek from a meaning “without” and stilbe meaning “lustre” referring to the fact that the leaves are not shiny.  Liberty Hyde Bailey termed this plant “graceful” in the early 1900’s.

  • Bouteloua gracilis syn. Bouteloua oligostachya Blue grama Z 4-9

    Shortish grass with spikelets like fake eyelashes - very cute

    $11.95/bareroot

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    One sided, horizontal, purple tinged spikelets in July-September, very unusual.

    Size: 2' x 12"
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Manitoba & all US except SE & Pacific NW, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the Navajo this was a “life medicine” and an antidote to an overdose of “life medicine.”  Also used to cure sore throats and cuts – chew on the root and blow on the cut.  Navajo girls carried it in the Squaw Dance.  Hopi made baskets from this grass.  Zuni made brooms & hairbrushes from it.  Several tribes ate this & made bedding for their animals from this.  1st collected for horticulture by Humboldt & Bonpland in early 1800’s.

  • Calamagrostis brachytricha Diamond grass, Feather reed grass

    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright plumes

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright pale pink plumes September to November

    Size: 4' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: East Asia

    Collected before 1856.

  • Calamagrostis x acutiflora”Karl Forester” Feather reed grass

    Completely, reliably erect grass - winner perennial plant of year award 2001.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Completely, reliably erect grass.

    Size: 3-5' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Cut back in late winter.
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of the Year 2001

    This is a natural cross of Calamagrostis epigeos and Calamagrostis arundinacea, natives of Asia and Europe.  German nurseryman Karl Forester’s (1874-1970) keen eye spotted this in the Hamburg Botanic Garden.   He listed this in his nursery catalog in 1939.  Under Nazi domination he risked it all by keeping Jewish friends & workers. After WW II his nursery was the only perennial supplier in East Germany.  This grass sent from Denmark to the US in 1964.

  • Campanula carpatica Tussock bellflower, Carpathian bellflower Z 3-8

    In summer blue, violet or white bells

    $8.75/bareroot

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    In summer blue, violet or white bells, excellent at front of border.

    Size: 12” x 12-24”
    Care: Sun moist well-drained soil, tolerant of Walnut toxicity
    Native: Carpathian mountains in central Europe
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Campanula is Latin meaning little bell.  In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers…”  Young roots were eaten in “sallets.”   Introduced to European gardens from the Carpathian Mountains in 1774. Sold by McMahon’s Philadelphia nursery in the early 1800’s.  Probably cultivated by Jefferson at Monticello.

  • Campanula persicifolia Peach-leafed bellflower Z 3-8

    In May and June outfacing bells blossom along the 2-3' stems in white or clear, sky blue.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    In May and June outfacing bells blossom along the 2-3′ stems in white or clear, sky blue.

    Size: 24-36" x 12"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained soil, tolerant of Walnut toxicity.
    Native: So. Europe and north and west Asia

    Both white and blue varieties grew in English gardens before 1580. Cultivated in America since the 1700’s.