Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 9–16 of 106 results

  • Anemone vitifolia ‘Robustissima’ Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and fall

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and early fall.

    Size: 30"x 36" spreader
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: early cultivated variety of A. vitifolia native to Nepal.

    The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.”  The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, used another species of Anemone to herald his coming in early spring. A. vitifolia first introduced from its native Nepal to European garden cultivation by Lady Amhurst in 1829.

  • Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

    Size: 20-30’ x 2’ at ground, 20’ on top.
    Care: sun to shade (one of few vines for shade) in moist well-drained to moist soil. Prune to encourage branching.
    Native: Maine to Georgia, west to KS.
    Wildlife Value: host Pipevine swallowtail butterfly

    Aristolochia is Greek for easing childbirth. Cherokee applied decoction of root for swollen legs & feet. Collected by Colonial nurseryman John Bartram and sent to England in 1763. Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. In Colonial and Victorian gardens, popular vine to create privacy and shade

  • Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7

    brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover's lacquered, round leaves

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves.

    Size: 6" x 6" spreading
    Care: part shade to shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to North Carolina, Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used Wild ginger for such diverse purposes as flavoring food, cure heart palpitations, induce menstrual cycles, cure “the bite of the serpent,” mend broken bones and lure catfish. Colonists used the plant to break fever and stimulate the appetite.

  • Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly weed, Pleurisy-root Z 4-9

    striking orange cymes in July-August

    $8.75/pot

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    Striking orange cymes in July-August on this American native.

    Size: 2-3' x 12"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to dry soil, Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: East and south North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: host for Monarch & Gray hairstreak butterfly caterpillars.

    Omaha Indian’s Shell Society took 4 days to dig, prepare and distribute the root to cure bronchial and pulmonary ailments. Most important medicine for the Menomonie. Iroquois smashed the root on runner’s legs to give them strength. Butterfly weed cured flu and remedied coyote bites for the Iroquios. 1st collected for gardens by Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia in 1678 He died when he bent over to collect a plant and a gunman mistakenly shot him. Jefferson grew this at Monticello.

  • Aster alpinus Alpine Aster Z 5-7

    Frilly little daisies, May-June, lavender, pink or white

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Frilly little daisies, May-June, lavender, pink or white. Plant where they’ll be seen in the front of the garden.  Also good in rock gardens

    Size: 6-10" x 18"
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & tolerant of Black walnut toxins
    Native: Rockies
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies

    Aster means star referring to the flower form. Collected by Drummond in the Rockies by 1800.

  • Aster cordifolium Blue wood aster Z 3-8

    Blue daisies late summer into fall - sun to shade

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Heart-shaped foliage smothered with blue daisies from late summer to fall, perfect companion for anemones

     


    Care: Sun to shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Canada to Florida, west to Oklahoma, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for many butterflies

    1st described by Jacques Philippe Cornuti in 1635.  Likely collected and transported to France by Samuel de Champlain.  Grown in Jardin du Roi in Paris.

  • Aster divaricatus syn. Eurybia divaricatus White wood aster Z 4-8

    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Sprays of loose, white daisies brighten the late summer and early fall garden.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Black walnuts
    Native: East North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Gertrude Jekyll, mother of the perennial border, often used this American native in combination with Bergenia. Cultivated in American gardens since 1800’s.

  • Aster novae angliae syn. Symphyotrichum New England Aster Z 4-8

    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Masses of violet, pink or magenta daisies cloak bushy New England asters from August to October.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun dry to moist soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Vt to Alabama, west to N. M., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced to gardens by Englishman Tradescant the Younger in 1637 when he carried it from Virginia Colony to England. Cultivated by George Washington.