Black Walnut Tolerant

Showing 89–96 of 106 results

  • Solidago caesia syn. Solidago axillaris Blue-stemmed goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod Z 4-9

    arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Graceful, arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems, in September-October. Clump forming, noninvasive perennial.

    Size: 18-24” x 16-20”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to WI, south to FL and west to TX
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet

    The Latin name is a combination of solidus and ago, meaning “I make whole”, referring to its historic medicinal uses. According to William Cullina it  has antioxidant, diuretic, astringent and antifungal properties and is supposed to be used to treat urinary tract and yeast infections, sore throats and diarrhea. (W. Cullina, NEWFS, p. 197)  Collected before 1753.

  • Solidago graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod Z 3-9

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

    Size: 2-3' x 1-2'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia across Canada, S. to FL., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts praying mantises and butterflies.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to “bring together.” Gramnifolia  means “grass-leaved.”  Since 1750’s.

  • Solidago riddellii syn. Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod Z. 3-7

    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.- loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulphur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent, & Cloudless sulphur.   Attracts praying mantises.

    Size: 3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: swath down middle of No. Am. From Hudson Bay to AK, incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and praying mantis. Deer resistant.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together. Collected by 1835.

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.  Not invasive.

    Size: 5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil
    Native: Central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning “to bring together.”
    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859.)

  • Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie dropseed Zone 3 – 9

    Mound of graceful thinnest of grass blades

    $11.95/bareroot

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    The description in the Chiltern Seeds catalog cannot be improved:  “This is the most elegant and refined of the North American prairie grasses …the finest texture composed of the thinnest of thin, thread-like, glossy green blades,.. in autumn turning deep orange before fading to a light copper for the winter.  In late summer the plants bear, on very slender stalks high above the foliage, unbelievably delicate, graceful flower panicles, excellent for cutting.”

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: from Canada in the north to Texas in the south, Wisconsin native

    Sporobolos is Greek from sporo meaning seed and ballein meaning to cast forth because the seed readily falls from the flower (or dropseed, the common name).  Ojibwa “Medicine Society” used roots to cure sores & “remove bile.”

  • Stachys byzantina Lamb’s ears, Woolly betony Z 4-8

    Velvety granite gray leaves, as soft as a lamb's ear

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Velvety granite-gray leaves, as soft as a lamb’s ear, bearing spikes with pale lavender flowers all summer.

    Size: 12-15" x 12-15"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant.
    Native: Iran

    Stachys is Greek meaning, “spike.” Believed to cure almost everything. Italians urged people to: “sell your coat and buy betony.” Cultivated by George Washington at Mount Vernon.

  • Stachys minima syn. Stachys spathulata Dwarf betony Z 5-9

    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

    Size: 2-6” x 15-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: South Africa
    Wildlife Value: Walnut tolerant, deer resistant, hummingbird plant

    Stachys is an old Greek word meaning “spike.”  This species collected from the wild before 1834.

  • Stachys officinalis syn. Betonica officinalis syn. Stachys betonica Bishop’s wort, Betony Z 4-8

    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    Size: 18-24” x 12-18” slowly spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: deer & walnut tolerant, attracts hummingbirds

    Once one of the most honored herbal medicines. Medicines were good if they had “as many virtues as Betony.” John Sauer, Colonial herbalist claimed “there is no illness brought on by cold in which Betony cannot be administered effectively.”