Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 169–176 of 193 results

  • Symphoricarpos orbiculatus Coralberry Z 2-7

    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

    Placeholder

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall
    Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

    Size: 2’-5’ x 4-8’
    Care: Full sun to full shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Eastern US from NY south to eastern TX, west to SD & CO.
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, bees and other pollinators.

    Was classified simultaneously by Michaux, Linnaeus, and finally Moench (1794) whose designation is used today.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphyandra pendula Bellflower Z 5-8

    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June  

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June

    Size: 20” x 12”
    Care: Full to part sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Collected before 1830

  • Syneilesis aconitifolia  syn. Senecio aconitifolia Shredded umbrella plant; in China, tu er san  Z 4-9

    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade.  I guess “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade.  I guess “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

    Size: 3’ x 2’
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to  well-drained soil 
    Native: China, on forest edges on slopes, Korea & Japan
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Drought tolerant once established. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    Described in Flora of China in 1833. Chinese used the whole plant for medicine, to relax and activate the tendons, alleviate pain around the waist and legs, and to treat most any injuries.

  • Synthyris missourica Mountain Kittentails Z 5-9

    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

    Size: 5-12” x 12” spreading into clumps by rhizomes.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains of northeast CA, Washington, Idaho & west to Montana

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on June 26, 1806 in today’s Idaho near the headwaters of what they named Hungry Creek. Common name kittentails imaginatively named for the flower stalk and its protruding stamens resembling, if you squint real hard and maybe after taking a swig of whiskey,  fuzzy, blue kitten tails.

  • Teucrium hircanicum syn. T hyrcanicum Iranian germander, Purple Tails, Wood Sage Z 5-9

    Flowering in summer with 3-4” tall veronica-like spikes of dark purple

    Placeholder

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Flowering in summer with 3-4” tall veronica-like spikes of dark purple

    Size: 18” x 28”
    Care: sun in well-drained
    Native: Iran, Southern Europe, Middle East
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies, deer resistant

    Described and named in 1759

  • Thalictrum aquilegifolium Meadowrue, Feathered columbine Z 5-9

    Strikingly delicate lavender plumes

    $11.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Strikingly delicate looking lavender plumes on 3′ tall foliage resembling a columbine.

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and North Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    In 1629 Parkinson, apothecary to James I and later, botanist to Charles I, called this “Tufted columbine” a descriptive name, the flowers are tufted and the leaves resemble those of a columbine.  Ancient Romans used it to cure ulcers, the plague and “the Faundife.”  Romans stuffed children’s’ pillows with the flowers to bring them wealth.  Liberty Hyde Bailey described Thalictrum aquilegifolium as:  “A good garden plant and frequently planted,”(1913). Cultivated in U.S. since 1700’s.

  • Thalictrum delavayi Yunnan meadow rue Z 4-7

    Purple flowers with showy sepals and stamens from July to August

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Purple to lavender flowers with showy sepals and stamens from July to August. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated  94 (2013)

    Size: 30” x 20”
    Care: sun - part shade in moist humusy soil
    Native: Tibet and China
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Thalictrum is from Greek meaning “to flourish” or “look green.”  This species discovered by and named for Pére Jean Delavay (1838-1895), French missionary to China.  Delavay found about 1500 new species in his three (3) trips to China. He sent his discoveries to the Jardin des Plantes in Paris.  In 1880 he contracted bubonic plague while in China, which disabled him the remainder of his life.

  • Thalictrum minus ‘Adiantifolium’ Fernleaf meadowrue Z 5-9

    Yellowish flowers in spring

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    In spring loose panicles of tiny yellowish flowers top fern-like ornamental foliage, 3′ tall.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly
    Awards: Rated as excellent by the Chicago Botanic Garden.

    Grown by English herbalist Gerard in the 1590’s.