Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 193–200 of 228 results

  • Solidago graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod Z 3-9

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

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    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

    Size: 2-3' x 1-2'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia across Canada, S. to FL., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts praying mantises and butterflies.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to “bring together.” Gramnifolia  means “grass-leaved.”  Since 1750’s.

  • Solidago riddellii syn. Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod Z. 3-7

    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.- loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulphur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent, & Cloudless sulphur.   Attracts praying mantises.

    Size: 3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: swath down middle of No. Am. From Hudson Bay to AK, incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and praying mantis. Deer resistant.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together. Collected by 1835.

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.  Not invasive.

    Size: 5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil
    Native: Central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning “to bring together.”
    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859.)

  • Solidago sphacelata ‘Golden Fleece’ Golden Fleece Goldenrod Z 4-8

    Dense horizontal golden panicles on this dwarf Goldenrod, August to September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Dense horizontal golden panicles on this dwarf Goldenrod, August to September

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: species SE US
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet Monarch, Viceroy & Painted ladies
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Award of Merit & Cornell University Allstar

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together.  Species collected by 1800’s but this cultivar selected by Dr. Richard Lightly at Mount Cuba Center in the 1980’s.  OK, it’s not old but it is so different from all other Goldenrods that I couldn’t resist.

  • Spigelia marilandica Carolina pink, Woodland pinkroot Z 5-9

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

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    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 12-24” x 6-18”
    Care: part to full shade in most well-drained soil, tolerates wet soil
    Native: NJ to Fl west to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds; deer resistant
    Awards: 2011 Theodore Klein Plant Award Winner

    Cherokee used this to purge parasites from intestines. In garden by 1753. Philip Miller’s Dictionary “the plant “is esteemed as the best medicine (in North America) yet known for the worms.” (1768)  According to Jacob Bigelow in American Medical Botany, 1817 one doctor used it as a purgative and another as a narcotic.

  • Spiraea alba Meadowsweet, Du Roi Z 3-7

    This short shrub sports white flower spikes 4” long blooming from June to August, deadhead for rebloom.

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    This short shrub sports white flower spikes 4” long blooming from June to August, deadhead for rebloom.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northeastern 2/3 of North America, WI native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & hosts caterpillars of Spring azure butterflies

    1st described in literature in 1772.  Algonquin made a medicinal tea with Meadowsweet’s leaves and stems.  Iroquois administered a decoction of mashed and powdered dry roots to remedy pain in the sides.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphoricarpos orbiculatus Coralberry Z 2-7

    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

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    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall
    Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

    Size: 2’-5’ x 4-8’
    Care: Full sun to full shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Eastern US from NY south to eastern TX, west to SD & CO.
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, bees and other pollinators.

    Was classified simultaneously by Michaux, Linnaeus, and finally Moench (1794) whose designation is used today.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphyandra pendula Bellflower Z 5-8

    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June  

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    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June

    Size: 20” x 12”
    Care: Full to part sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Collected before 1830