Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 193–200 of 223 results

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Broad spikes of erect panicles of mustard yellow welcome late summer into autumn

    $12.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Broad spikes of erect panicles of mustard yellow welcome late summer into autumn

    Size: 3-5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil, stands up to wind, no staking needed
    Native: Central & eastern US, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this plant for many things – to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk and Winnebago made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859) who wandered over all of No. America searching for plants, animals, birds and rocks from 1809 to 1842.

  • Spigelia marilandica Carolina pink, Woodland pinkroot Z 5-9

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK – EMAIL FOR AVAILABILITY AFTER 6/1/23

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 12-24” x 6-18”
    Care: part to full shade in most well-drained soil, tolerates wet soil
    Native: NJ to Fl west to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds; deer resistant
    Awards: 2011 Theodore Klein Plant Award Winner

    Cherokee used this to purge parasites from intestines. In garden by 1753. Philip Miller’s Dictionary “the plant “is esteemed as the best medicine (in North America) yet known for the worms.” (1768)  According to Jacob Bigelow in American Medical Botany, 1817 one doctor used it as a purgative and another as a narcotic.

  • Spiraea alba Meadowsweet, Du Roi Z 3-7

    This short shrub sports white flower spikes 4” long blooming from June to August, deadhead for rebloom.

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    This short shrub sports white flower spikes 4” long, blooming from June to August, deadhead for rebloom.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northeastern 2/3 of North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: nectar attracts butterflies & hosts caterpillars of Spring azure butterflies

    1st described in literature in 1772.  Algonquin made a medicinal tea with Meadowsweet’s leaves and stems.  Iroquois administered a decoction of mashed and powdered dry roots to remedy pain in the sides.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphoricarpos albus Snowberry Z 3-7

    Clustered spikes of tiny, bell-shaped, watermelon-pink buds open to blush-toned  flowers in the leaf axils of arching stems in early to mid-summer. Flowers are followed by clustered spikes of round berries (drupes) that start pale green, ripen to clean snow white with a waxy skin by late summer looking like big pearls. Fruits remain on the leafless winter stems showing off until spring.

    Placeholder

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Clustered spikes of tiny, bell-shaped, watermelon-pink buds open to blush-toned  flowers in the leaf axils of arching stems in early to mid-summer. Flowers are followed by clustered spikes of round berries (drupes) that start pale green, ripen to clean snow white with a waxy skin by late summer looking like big pearls. Fruits remain on the leafless winter stems showing off until spring.

    Size: 3-6’ x 3-6’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Novia Scotia to British Columbia south to New Mexico on the west, Virginia on the east, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant, flowers attract hummingbirds, numerous bee species and moths. The shrub is habitat for several bird species. The drupes provide food for Grouse, Pheasant, Prairie chicken, Quail, Robins, Cedar waxwing, and Grosbeak.

    Many Native Americans put the Snowberry to numerous uses.  The largest number of tribes made preparations of different plant parts for skin such as a wash for injuries, burns, chapped skin, cuts, sores, “truthfulness” (Nitinaht of British Columbia), deodorant, itch, rash, sores and antiseptic. Next most common use, Natives remedied sore eyes.  Several groups used it to counteract difficulty urinating for people and horses. Uses for Snowberry contradict one another.  Several tribes considered eating the drupes as poison while others ate the drupes as food, an antidote to poisoning, and to “clean out” a new mother after giving birth.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Symphoricarpos orbiculatus Coralberry Z 2-7

    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Pinkish white bell shaped flowers in June-July give way to coral-red berries in fall
    Berries persist through winter, giving colorful interest and food for the birds.

    Size: 2’-5’ x 4-8’
    Care: Full sun to full shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Eastern US from NY south to eastern TX, west to SD & CO.
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, bees and other pollinators.

    Was classified simultaneously by Michaux, Linnaeus, and finally Moench (1794) whose designation is used today.

  • Symphyandra pendula Bellflower Z 5-8

    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June  

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Panicles of creamy white bell-shaped flowers dangle over heart-shaped foliage March-June

    Size: 20” x 12”
    Care: Full to part sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Collected before 1830

  • Symphyandra zanzegur    Rock bellflower   Z 5-10

    Flared lilac bells hang from wiry stems all summer.  Self-sows.

    Placeholder

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Flared lilac bells hang from wiry stems all summer.  Self-sows.

    Size: 10” x 15”  
    Care: part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: Mountains of Armenia

    Genus Symphyandra named before 1841. This species so rare that I can’t find historic info. about it.

  • Syneilesis aconitifolia  syn. Senecio aconitifolia Shredded umbrella plant; in China, tu er san  Z 4-9

    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade.  I guess “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade.  I guess “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

    Size: 3’ x 2’
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to  well-drained soil 
    Native: China, on forest edges on slopes, Korea & Japan
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Drought tolerant once established. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    Described in Flora of China in 1833. Chinese used the whole plant for medicine, to relax and activate the tendons, alleviate pain around the waist and legs, and to treat most any injuries.