Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 177–184 of 193 results

  • Thalictrum polygamum syn. T. pubescens Tall Meadowrue, King of the meadow Z. 4-8

    Showy, delicate ivory stamens July to September

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    Showy, delicate ivory stamens July to September

    Size: 3-8’ x 4’
    Care: part shade to shade in moist soil
    Native: along streams & ponds from Newfoundland west to the Mississippi River & south to Mississippi
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly
    Awards: Rated as “excellent” by the Chicago Botanic Garden
    Size: Iroquois smashed this Meadowrue to wash their heads and necks for nosebleeds. They also used it to remedy gall ailments. For the Montagnais its leaves flavored salmon.

    Thalictrum is from Greek meaning “to flourish” or “look green.”  Collected  before 1793. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Thalictrum rochebruneanum Lavender mist meadowrue Z 5-8

    Airy clusters of lavender blooms

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    Lacy, fine-textured, bluish-green, pinnately compound, columbine-like foliage topped by pendulous, lavender-purple flowers with yellow stamens July-September in airy clusters rising well above the foliage to 4-6′ tall. Extraordinary en mass.

    Size: 4-6’ x 30”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly

    Collected for gardens before 1878. Likely named for Alphonse Trémeau de Rochebrune (1834-1912)

  • Tradescantia bracteata Spiderwort Z. 4-9

    rosy purple flowers July-August

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    rosy purple flowers July-August

    Size: 12-18” x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: WY east to MI, south to OK, WI native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Genus named after John Tradescant the Younger, an English botanist, who introduced Tradescantia virginiana to garden cultivation in 1637, when he sent it to his father, gardener to King Charles I.   This prairie plant collected before 1938.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

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    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Verbena bonariensis Perennial Z 7-10, colder zones-reseeding annual

    Small purple flowers atop tall leafless stems from July to October. Great see-through blooms for growing in back, middle or front of the garden.

    $3.25/pot

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    Small purple flowers atop tall leafless stems from July to October.  Great see-through blooms for growing in back, middle or front of the garden.

    Size: 3-4’ x 8”
    Care: full sun in moist, well-drained, fertile soil - self-seeder
    Native: South America
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Introduced to garden cultivation from its native Buenos Aires in 1726 by the Sherard brothers.

  • Vernonia fasciculata Prairie Ironweed Z 3-7

    Dense clusters of true royal purple August-September

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    Dense clusters of true royal purple August-September

    Size: 3-4’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well drained soil
    Native: so central Canada to central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Deer resistant

    Collected by André Michau (1746-1802) by 1803. Named to honor Wm. Vernon, an English botanist who collected plants in late 1600’s.  

  • Vernonia lettermannii Threadleaf ironweed Z 4-9

    Deep purple inch-wide flower heads top unbranched stems forming a dome in late summer-early fall

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    Deep purple inch-wide flower heads top unbranched stems forming a dome in late summer-early fall

    Size: 24” x 36”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Arkansas and OK
    Wildlife Value: attracts numerous butterflies and pollen source for bees, deer resistant

    Collected on “Cooper’s Creek by Dr. J.M. Bigelow and on the sandbars of the Washita,.” Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts xvi. (1881) 78. 78 1880. “Notes on Some Compositae”  The species named to honor George Lettermann (1840-1913) who was primarily interested in trees and, while working for the US Census he collected tree specimens in  forests of Missouri, Arkansas, western Louisiana and eastern Texas.  

  • Vernonia noveboracensis Ironweed Z 4-8

    numerous deep crimson- purple daisies

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Heads of numerous deep royal purple daisies, August to September

    Size: 5' x 2'
    Care: Sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: from Massachusetts to Florida
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Named for English botanist William Vernon. Infusions of the plant used by Cherokee to relieve pain after childbirth, for loose teeth and for stomach ulcers.