Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 9–16 of 228 results

  • Aethionema grandiflorum Persian stonecress Z 5-8

    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

    Size: 6-12” x 12-18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Iran, Iraq, Caucasus, Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts honeybees & other pollinators, Deer & Rabbit resistant.
    Awards: Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society

    Short-lived perennial, but self-seeds where happy. Described in 1849 by Pierre Edmond Boissier and Rudolph Friedrich Hohenacker.

  • Agastache aurantiaca Navajo sunset Z 5-9

    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Agastache aurantiaca   Navajo sunset   Z 5-9
    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant

    Published in American Midland Naturalist 1945.

  • Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop

    Showy blue spikes from July to September, fragrant

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Agastache foeniculum  Anise hyssop Z 4-8
    Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant

    Size: 3-5' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning much like an ear of wheat referring to the shape of the flower spike. Anise hyssop leaves were used by American Indians of the Missouri River region to make tea and as a sweetener in cooking. The Cheyenne used it to relieve chest pain due to coughing or to a dispirited heart. Listed hyssop as an aromatic herb in McMahon’s 1805 book.

  • Agastache rupestris Sunset hyssop Z 5-10

    Tangerine & lilac spikes June - October, fragrant like anise

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Tangerine & lilac spikes June – October, fragrant like anise

    Size: 24”x 10”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: SW United States
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds
    Awards: 1997 Plant Select award recipient.

    Collected by Edward Lee Greene in 1880 at Mango Springs neara Solver City New Mexico. Pittonia 1:164.
    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning “much like an ear of wheat” referring to the shape of the flower spike. Rupestris means “rock loving.”

  • Alcea rosea Hollyhock BIENNIAL

    Early to late summer spikes of single platters - mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Alcea rosea   Hollyhock   BIENNIAL reseeds  Z 4-9
    Early to late summer spikes of single platters – mixed colors. The classic cottage garden flower.

    Size: 5-8' x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly plant, host for Painted Lady butterflies

    Cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by the 1400’s. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

  • Alcea rosea var. nigra Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.  

    Placeholder

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Alcea rosea var. nigra  Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.

     

    Size: 5-8’ x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Hollyhocks have been cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by 1573. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

    In the 1880’s Mr. W. Charter of Saffron Walden in England cultivated frilly doubles, now known as ‘Charter’s Doubles.’

  • Allium cernuum Nodding onion Z 4-8

    Umbels of arching stems with nodding bells of lilac shading to pink

    $7.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium cernuum  Nodding onion   Z 4-8
    Umbels of arching stems with nodding bells of lilac shading to pink, June – July.

    Size: 12”-18”x 3-6”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant
    Native: Canada to Mexico, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Cernuum is Latin meaning “nodding.”  Many groups of 1st Americans ate the bulbs raw, roasted or dried for winter storage or as flavoring for soups and gravies. Cherokee used this plant medicinally to cure colds, hives, colic, “gravel & dropsy,” liver ailments, sore throats, “phthisic,” and feet in “nervous fever.”  Those in the Isleta Pueblo were not quite as creative as the Cherokee and used this only for sore throats and infections.  Collected for garden cultivation by 1834.

  • Allium flavum var. minus Yellow flowered garlic

    Umbels of shatter-shot yellow florets on blue-green stems in July

    $7.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium flavum var. minus  Z 4-7
    Umbels of shatter-shot yellow florets, a bit like fireworks, on blue-green stems  in July

    Size: 10” x 3”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Turkey
    Wildlife Value: resistant to rabbits & deer. Attracts bees and butterflies
    Awards: species received Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Swiss botanist Pierre Edmond Boissier before 1885