Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 5–8 of 214 results

  • Achillea tomentosa Woolly yarrow Z 4-8

    Lemony colored flower heads from June to September, wooly foliage

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    Achillea tomentosa  Woolly yarrow   Z 4-8
    Lemony colored flower heads from June to September, wonderful, wooly foliage. Good in front of the border or on rock gardens.

    Size: 8” x 12”
    Care: Full sun in moist to dry soil, will rebloom if deadheaded. Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: Southern to Eastern Europe
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Grown in English gardener Tradescant the Elder’s garden 1630. “A splendid plant with fern like foliage and rich golden-yellow flower heads.” H.H. Thomas, 1915.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Aconitum fischeri Fischer’s monkshood syn. A. carmichaelii

    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October

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    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October       POISON

    Size: 24-36”x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist soil
    Native: No. Japan, E. Russia, Korea, China
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies.

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  In China called “bao ye wo tou.”  Wm. Robinson considered this one of the best monkshoods.  Collected before 1820.

  • Adlumia fungosa Allegheny vine, Climbong fumitory, Bleeding heart vine Biennial Z 4-8

    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

    Size: 6-10’ x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to No. Carolina west to Minnesota Wisconsin native status-special concern
    Wildlife Value: attracts bumblebees

    Named for John Adium (1759-1836), surveyor, judge and planter on 200 acre farm in Georgetown.
    1st described in 1789 (Aiton, Vol. 3 Hortus Kewensis).

  • Aesculus pavia

    Spectacular raspberry colored upright panicles in spring

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    Aesculus pavia Red buckeye Z 5-8
    Spectacular raspberry colored upright panicles in spring

    Size: 15’ x 10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well drained soil- understory tree
    Native: eastern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & feeds hummingbirds
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold Medal Plant Award & Missouri Botanic Garden Award of Merit

    Aesculus is a Latin name for a nut bearing tree. Pavia comes from Peter Pav, a Dutch professor at University of Leyden. This plant collected by John Bartram and sent to England by 1711. Jefferson grew this at Monticello, planted in 1798. Nuts from the tree were used by Native Americans to stupefy fish. Chickasaws pulverized the root, placed it in baskets and violently churned the baskets in the river to poison fish. Cherokee Indians carried the nuts in their pockets for good luck, as well as for curing piles and rheumatism. Pounded nuts also cured swelling, sprains, tumors and infections.