Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 17–20 of 194 results

  • Allium senescens Corkscrew allium, German garlic, Greater mountain garlic Z 4-9

    Lavender balls, up to 30 of them, atop thin, bluish, strap-like, twisting foliage – mid-summer day’s dream.

    $6.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium senescens  Corkscrew allium, German garlic, Greater mountain garlic Z 4-9
    Lavender balls, up to 30 of them, atop thin, bluish, strap-like, twisting foliage – mid-summer day’s dream.

    Size: 6-12” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Siberia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & bees, deer & rabbit resistant

    Cultivated before 1753. According to Philip Miller’s 1768 Dictionary, “planted in gardens for the variety of their flowers.”

  • Allium tuberosum Garlic chives

    August & September bright white balls on erect stems. Pretty in fall gardens & delicious too.

    $6.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Allium tuberosum Garlic chives  Z 4-8
    August & September bright white balls on erect stems. Pretty in fall gardens & delicious too. Ornamental in gardens and in arrangements, both fresh and dried, delicious edible – both leaves and flowers taste just like garlic.

    Size: 12-18” x 8”
    Care: Full sun or shade in any soil
    Native: Southeast Asia
    Wildlife Value: nectar source for many butterlies including the Tiger Swallowtail.

    Used medicinally in Asia as a remedy for incontinence, bladder weakness, and kidney trouble and knee injuries. Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners made a powder from the seeds called Jiu Cai Zi used for numerous ailments.

  • Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Blue gray foliage turns plum orange in fall

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Andropogon scoparium  Little bluestem  Z 5-9
    Blue gray  foliage turns plum orange in fall  with wispy, feather-like seed heads

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    Discovered by French plant hunter André Michaux (1746-1802) in America’s prairies.  Comanche used it to relieve syphilitic sores.  Lakota made soft wispy seed heads into liners for moccasins.

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone PERENNIAL Z. 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    $6.95/pot

    Buy

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.