Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 145–152 of 210 results

  • Primula denticulata Drumstick primula   Z 2-9

    Dense balls of blue flowerheads up to 4” wide rise above rosettes of wrinkly, lance shaped leaves

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Dense balls of blue flowerheads up to 4” wide rise above rosettes of wrinkly, lance shaped leaves

    Size: 8-12” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.  Tolerates wet soil. Deer and rabbit resistant.
    Native: China & Himalayas
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Collected by John Forbes Royle, then made available to European gardeners in 1842 by Veitch nurseries, one of the most important plant nurseries at the time.  In 1842 Veitch nursery won the Banskian Medal for their display of Primula denticulata exhibited at the London Horticultural Society.

  • Primula x bulleesiana Candelabra primrose Z 4-7

    Blooms June-July, a rainbow of colors ranging from red, orange, rose, to cream, lavender and purple

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    Blooms June-July, a rainbow of colors ranging from red, orange, rose, to cream, lavender, and purple

    Size: 18-24” x 12-18”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to wet well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Deer resistant
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit 1993

    Hybrid cross between Primula bulleyana and Primula beesiana (both parents are native to the Himalayas and China).
    Collected in China, introduced to Britain in 1906

  • Pulmonaria angustifolia Narrow-leaf lungwort, Blue cowslip Z 4-8

    One of the earliest to flower - Pink turning azure blue, trumpet-shaped flowers in April- May. Fuzzy foliage.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    One of the earliest to flower – Pink turning azure blue, trumpet-shaped flowers in April- May. Fuzzy foliage.

    Size: 12”x 18”
    Care: full to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Austria & Hungary.
    Wildlife Value: walnut and deer tolerant. Early source of nectar for bees.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Angustifolia means “narrow leaves.”  Grown in gardens before 1590’s.

  • Pulsatilla vulgaris var. ‘Alba’ Z 4-8

    Pure white petals of open bell-shape with yellow centers flowers in early spring. Fun, furry foliage and Medusa-like seed heads.

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    Pure white petals of open bell-shape with yellow centers flowers in early spring. Fun, furry foliage and Medusa-like seed heads.

    Size: 8-12” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant, early pollen source for bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    “There is a variety of (Pulsatilla vulgaris) with white flowers…” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.

  • Pycanthemum virginianum Mountain mint Z 4-8

    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms, leaves fragrant.

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms in August, leaves fragrant, like mint.

    Size: 3' x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Wisconsin native, Eastern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Pycanthemum is Greek meaning “dense blossom.” Chippewa used it to stop menstrual flow, cure chills and fever and to season meat. The plant gave the Meskwaki energy and lured minks into traps.

  • Ratibida pinnata Prairie coneflower Z 3-8

    drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Skirt of drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone on this flower, June-August.  Flower is fragrant, smells of anise.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Ontario, VT to FL, SD to OK, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Birds eat seeds.

    Pinnata means “feathery” in Latin referring to the thin petals of the flower.  1st Americans cured toothaches with the root & made tea from the cone and leaves.  Collected by French explorer Michaux on the prairies of Illinois in 1795.

  • Rudbeckia fulgida Black eyed susan Z 4-9

    classic Black-eyed susan, 3" wide yellow daisies with a dark center

    $12.25/bareroot

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    The classic Black-eyed susan, 3″ wide yellow daisies with a dark center from July – October

    Size: 36" x 18" spreads
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Southeastern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Rudbeckia was named by Linnaeus for his University of Upsala professor,Olaf Rudbeck.  Rudbeck made the surprising assertion “that the Paradise of Scripture was situated somewhere in Sweden.”   C.F. Leyel.  Cherokee used this species to remedy earaches, sores, flux, “some private diseases,” snakebites, dropsy, and swelling.  Also used to make a brown dye.   

  • Rudbeckia laciniata ‘Herbstsonne’ Rudbeckia nitida ‘Herbstsonne’ syn. Rudbeckia ‘Autumn Sun’ Z 5-10

    exceptionally large, floppy, lemon yellow petals

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Exceptionally tall and exceptionally large, floppy, lemon yellow petals and it blooms for 4 months.  Tall but stays upright without staking.  Unusual green central cone.  Blooms July-October. What could be better for the back of the border?

    Size: 4-7’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: provides butterfly nectar and seeds food for birds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    No one seems sure which species this comes from Rudbeckia laciniata or Rudbeckia nitida.  Both are very tall with drooping yellow petals and a tall central cone or seed head.  This cultivar is different because it has a green cone or seed head instead of the usual brown or black one, as in Black-eyed susan or Brown-eyed susan. It’s “an old selection.”