Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 121–128 of 228 results

  • Liatris aspera Rough blazing star Z 4-9

    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Feathery purple buttons along tall spike in late summer: August-October, after all other Liatris are done flowering.

    Size: 24”-30” x 12”-18”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: So. Canada, much of eastern 3/4th of U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies (favorite nectar for Monarchs and Buckeyes) & hummingbirds.

    Aspera is Latin meaning rough.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Liatris pycnostachya Prairie blazing star Z 3-9

    Tall, erect, purplish- pink spike in August-September

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Tall, erect, purplish- pink spike in August-September

    Size: 4’ x 1-2’
    Care: well-drained soil in full sun
    Native: central & SE US
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, attracts birds,& butterflies.

    Collected by French planthunter Andre Michaux in 1795 on the prairies of Illinois.

  • Liatris spicata Blazing star, Gayfeather Z 4-9

    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy rosy purple spikes in July & August. Great cut flowers.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern and southern U. S., Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used the roots medicinally. The Dakota recognized this as an indication “when the flower is blue-red that corn is good to eat.” The dried root reputedly repelled moths. First collected by English naturalist Mark Catesby around 1732.

  • Lilium canadense, Z 2-6

    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

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    Showy, drooping bell-shaped flowers from lemon to dark orange in color with conspicuous red spots on the inside

    Size: 3-8' X 2-3'
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained, slightly acidic soil
    Native: Upper Great Lakes & southern Canada
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Introduced to gardens from its native North America by Jacques Cartier, 1535. Also collected by Pehr Kalm who sent it to Linnaeus. Listed in the 1873 catalog of Leichtlin’schen Gartens in Baden-Baden.

  • Lilium martagon Martagon lily Z 3-10

    pink-purple lilies with down-facing, reflexed petals

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    Stalk of dozens of pink-purple, white or red lilies with down-facing, reflexed petals in early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Bulbs resent disturbance and may not flower the 1st year after planting.
    Native: from eastern France west to Asia
    Wildlife Value: Swallowtail and Tiger butterflies love the flowers

    Listed in Turner’s book as growing in England (1548). Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Lilium was named for the Greek word for smooth, polished referring to its leaves. Received Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

  • Linaria alpina Alpine toadflax Z 5-8

    Purple snapdragon-like petals bloom all summer and  show off golden-orange lips

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    Purple snapdragon-like petals bloom all summer and  show off golden-orange lips

    Size: 4-6” x 6-12”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains of central and southern Europe

    Listed in Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.  Wm Robinson in July 1872 issue of The Garden: “The alpine Linaria is never more beautiful than when self-sown in a gravel walk.” January 1876 bloomed for 4+ months in the rock garden at Edinburgh Botanic Garden.

  • Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal flower Z 3-9

    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

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    Ruby, cardinal red tubes with an upper lip split in half and a lower lip like a pixie’s apron encircle the spike from August to October beckon hummingbirds to feed.

    Size: 3’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Native: sun to part shade in fertile, moist soil. Moist soil important
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit.

    Lobelia is named for Matthias L’Obel (1538-1616) French expatriate who immigrated to England and became physician to English King James I. Tradescant the Younger introduced L. cardinalis to European gardens when he sent it to England in 1637. Later collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants. Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog. Cherokee cured stomach aches, worms, pain, fever, nose bleeds, rheumatism, headaches, colds and croup with Lobelia. They used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used five species of Lobelia to cure venereal disease, “an infallible art of curing it.” Other Indians and colonists used the plant to induce vomiting and as an expectorant. At the end of a funeral, Meskwaki Indians threw the dried and pulverized plant into the grave. Meskwaki also chopped the roots and secretly put it in the food of “a quarrelsome pair.” Allegedly “this makes the pair love each other again.” Grown by Washington at Mount Vernon and Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Lobelia siphilitica Great lobelia Z 5-9

    Medium to dark blue racemes from August to October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Medium to dark blue racemes of two-lipped flowers from August to October

    Size: 3' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern United States
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.

    Introduced to gardens before 1665. Cherokee used the root to treat syphilis and in 1749 Swedish botanist Peter Kalm wrote that Indians used Lobelia to cure venereal disease, having “an infallible art of curing it.”