Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 105–112 of 228 results

  • Geranium maculatum American Cranesbill Z 4-8

    Bright pink to lilac pink blooms

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Geranium maculatum  American Cranesbill, Wild geranium, Spotted geranium  Z 4-8
    Bright pink to lilac pink blooms in June – July

    Size: 30" x 18"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Walnut toxicity
    Native: East North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Geranium is Greek meaning “crane” referring to the shape of fruit resembling the bill of a crane.   This species 1st collected by Michaux.  Jefferson asked John Bartram to obtain seeds, 1786. G. maculatum considered “a showy native species” (Bailey.)  Native Americans taught colonists to use the plant to cure diarrhea, dysentery and hemorrhaging. Also used on open wounds and sore feet. Sent to Europe in 1732.

  • Globularia trichosantha Blue Globe Daisy Z 5-9

    Globe-shaped blue puffs bloom in late spring above a mat of evergreen foliage

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    Globe-shaped blue puffs bloom in late spring above a mat of evergreen foliage

    Size: 6-8” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkan region of eastern Europe.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees

    Collected before 1839.

  • Hesperaloe parviflora Red Yucca Z 6-9

    Cerise scarlet trumpets up and down the flower spike in summer

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Cerise scarlet trumpets up and down the flower spike in summer

    Size: 3’ x 5’
    Care: sun moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Europe, west & central Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies & hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit tolerant,

    Named by Dr. George Engelmann, a German physician and plant fanatic who emigrated to America in the early 1800’s, settling in St. Louis.

  • Heuchera versicolor syn. H. rubescens var. versicolor Pink alumroot Z 4-10

    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Tiny pink bells on narrow inflorescence blooming mid to late summer

    Size: 8-12” x 12"
    Care: prefers part shade in moist well-drained to well drained soil, can grow in sun with moist soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: southwestern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    First collected in 1904 on damp, shady bluffs of the Black Range in New Mexico, accd. to Edward Lee Greene.

    The roots are astringent and can also be used as an alum substitute, used in fixing dyes. Was also used medicinally for fever, diarrhea, venereal disease, liver ailments, eyewash, colic and animal care.  Heuchera is named for Johann Heinrich von Heucher (1677-1747), while rubescens means becoming red or reddish, and versicolor means variously colored.

  • Hibiscus moscheutos Rose mallow Z 5-10

    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Decadent platters of crimson, rose or white with cerise centers in August and September on 6′ tall, very sturdy stalks. Look tropical, but they’re hardy.

    Size: 8' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Southern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    One Native American tribe used this plant to cure inflammed bladders. 1st collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1680.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Bloomed for Jefferson at Monticello in July, 1767.

  • Holodiscus discolor Creambush, Ocean spray Z 5-10

    Multistemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Multi-stemmed shrub with dense, elegant pyramidal clusters of arching cream-colored flowers in early to mid summer. Leaves tint red in fall.

    Size: 4-8’ x 8’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Montana to Colorado west to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds, food for butterfly caterpillars, bird habitat.

    Hard and durable wood was used to make digging sticks, spears, harpoon shafts, bows, and arrows by nearly all coastal Native groups. A few used the wood to make sticks to barbeque salmon, fish hooks, needles for weaving and knitting, Pegs were made to use like nails. Others made wood intoarmor plating and canoe paddles.
    A few Natives made an infusion of boiled fruit to cure diarrhea, measles, chickenpox and as a blood tonic.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in today’s Idaho on the Clearwater River, May 29, 1806 en route back east on  the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

  • Humulus lupulus Hops Z 4-8

    climber bearing papery cones, green turning straw colored

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Vigorous 20′ tall climber bearing papery cones, green turning straw colored from August to October.

    Size: 20' x 3'
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Transported from continental Europe to England in 1524.  Flowers used for brewing since ancient times. Added to ale to add flavor and as a preservative.  In the late 1500’s Gerard claimed that hops seasoned ale and”make it a physical drinke to keep the body in health, rather than an ordinary drinke for the quenching of our thirst.”  Russians crowned the heads of brides with its foliage to bring “joy, abundance and intoxication.”  Others put dried hops into pillows to relieve insomnia.  Imported to America by the mid 1600’s where it was used for its ornamental qualities, to provide shade and to make beer.   Cherokee adopted hops to relieve pain caused by rheumatism. Grown by Jefferson at Monticello.

  • Hunnemannia fumariifolia Goldencup, Mexican Tulip Poppy Z 9-11, Annual in colder areas

    yellow crepe-papery petals encircle orange stamens, poppy-like blooms, above dissected blue-green foliage

    $5.25/pot

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    Non-stop, very showy, bright yellow crepe-papery petals encircle orange stamens, poppy-like blooms, above dissected blue-green foliage. Without doubt, our favorite annual.

    Size: 2-3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: highlands in Chihuahua Desert from northern Mexico into southern Arizona and Texas.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and bees

    Described in The British Flower Garden  3: 54, pl. 276. 1828.