Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 113–120 of 228 results

  • Hydrangea petiolaris syn. Hydrangea anomala petiolaris Climbing hydrangea Z 4-8

    Big white lacecap flowers blanket this climbing vine in early summer.

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    Big white lacecap flowers blanket this climbing vine in early summer.

    Size: 40’ x 5-10’
    Care: sun or shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan & Korea
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Collected by German physician and botanist Philipp Franz von Siebold in Japan during his residency on Nagaski working for the Dutch trading post there, 1823-1829. He introduced more then 2000 Japanese plants to Europe.  1st described in Flora Japonica 1839

  • Ipomopsis aggregata Standing cypress, Skyrocket, Scarlet gilia Z 4-11 Reseeding biennial

    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

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    $5.25/pot

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    Showy red trumpets along leafless stem brighten summer-fall garden

    Size: 3-5’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: west from ND, south to TX to the Pacific.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, Swallowtail butterflies and flocks of hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Lolo Trail June 26 1806.

  • Ipomopsis rubra Standing Cypress, Scarlet Gilia Z 5-9 Biennial

    Red-orange trumpet-shaped blooms encircle 3-5’ tall spike from May-July

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    Red-orange trumpet-shaped blooms encircle 3-5’ tall spike from May-July

    Size: 3-5’ x 3-6’
    Care: sun in dry to moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Oklahoma-South Carolina, Florida to Texas
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, Swallowtail butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

    Described by Linnaeus in Species Plantarum 1: 163. 1753

  • Iris missouriensis Western blue flag, Rocky Mountain iris Z 3-8

     In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

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    $10.95/bareroot

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     In spring variegated, violet blue iris flowers per stem. Each flower has 6 perianth segments, three elongated spreading to reflexed falls have a central dark yellow-orange stripe and diverging blue lines on a white background, and three erect, more narrow, lilac-purple to dark blue standards.

    Size: 12-24” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil. Divide regularly.
    Native: Alberta and British Columbia, from Minnesota to Washington south to California east to New Mexico
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts hummingbirds, provides pollen to bees.

    Named for the Missouri River although ironically Lewis collected it along the Blackfoot River in today’s Montana on July 5, 1806.
    Paiute Indians of eastern California and southeastern Oregon made ear drops to remedy earaches with a decoction if the Iris roots.

  • Jasione montana syn J. laevis Sheep’s bit Scabious BIENNIAL Z 5-8

    Globes of small blue flowers in July-August

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    Globes of small blue flowers in July-August

    Size: 12” x 8”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe and Russia
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and many other pollinators.

    Described by Linnaeus 1753

  • Knautia macedonica syn. Scabiosa rumelica Pincushion plant Z 5-9

    Claret pincushions float at the tips of airy wands all summer & fall

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Claret pincushions float at the tips of airy wands all summer & fall

    Size: 2- 3’ x 10”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Keep compact by cutting back to 10” in spring, if you wish
    Native: Central Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Knautia named for German doctor & botanist Christoph Knaut (1656-1716) who published a method of classifying plants.  Collected before 1879

  • Kniphofia triangularis Dwarf Red hot poker Z 5-8

    From early to late summer, with dead-heading, vivid coral spikes, like a torch .

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    From early to late summer, with dead-heading, vivid coral spikes, like a torch .

    Size: 2’ x 12-18”
    Care: sun in moist to well-drained soil, Drought tolerant once established
    Native: mountain grassland & moist areas in the Eastern Cape to the Northern province of South Africa.
    Wildlife Value: This plant has everything- resistant to deer & rabbits, long blooming, great cut flowers, hummingbirds and butterflies love it.

    1st described in 1854 in Enumeratio Plantarum Omnium Hucusque Cognitarum.

  • Lavandula angustifolia Lavender Z 5-9

    Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer.

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    The best fragrance – in both flowers & foliage. Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer.

    Size: 24" x 4'
    Care: Sun, well-drained soil. Well-drained soil essential. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Western Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Name is from Latin lavare meaning “to wash” because Romans scented their baths with lavender. Ancient Phoenicians used lavender to make perfume. Charlemagne’s list of cultivated plants in his empire included lavender, c. 800 A.D. Cultivated in Islamic gardens by 1050. Elizabeth I ate lavender conserve, made by adding sugar to the flowers while Charles VI of France stuffed pillows with lavender and sat on them. Culpepper wrote that lavender was grown in almost every garden and cured headaches, apoplexy, dropsy, fainting, toothaches, and “passions of the heart.”