Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 97–104 of 228 results

  • Euonymus carnosus Flesh-flowered Spindletree Z 4-7

    Small tree bearing white flowers in spring turning to red berries in fall. Glossy foliage turns purple in fall.

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    $15.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Small tree bearing white flowers in spring turning to red berries in fall. Glossy foliage turns purple in fall.

    Size: 8-12' x 6'
    Care: Sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: China & Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & birds

    Collected by 1886

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Eupatorium coelestinum album syn Conoclinium coelestinum ‘Album’ Mistflower ‘Album’ Z 3-7

    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum - August to October.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum – August to October.

    Size: 3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central and Southeastern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies - nectar source for American painted lady butterfly

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator, ancient king of Pontus, Greece, said by
    Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C.  ‘Album’ first published in 1940.

  • Eupatorium coelestinum Blue mist

    Clusters of cornflower blue in fall - August to October.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Clusters of cornflower blue in fall – looks like a big Ageratum but it’s a perennial, not an annual – August to October. One of the best fall flowers.

    Size: 3' x 2-3'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of walnut toxicity.
    Native: New Jersey - Missouri
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies - nectar source for American painted lady butterfly

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator, ancient king of Pontus, Greece, said by Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C.  This species 1st collected by John Bartram in 1732 and offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

  • Eupatorium perfoliatum Boneset, Thoroughwort

    Frilly white cymes brighten the garden - July to September

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Frilly white cymes brighten the garden – July to September

    Size: 4’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to Florida & TX, WI
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Lost meadowlark butterflies. Bronze copper, Monarch, Crescent and Fritillary butterflies feast on the flower’s nectar in fall.

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator (132-63 BC)  king of Pontus, Greece, said by Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C. This named “boneset” because it treated breakbone fever in the 1800’s. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.  Sent to England in 1699.

  • Eupatorium purpureum Joe Pye weed Z 3-9

    Sun, moist, alkaline soil

    $10.95/bareroot

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    From July to September 6′ tall stalks bear showy dusty rose flower heads.

    Size: 5-6' x 3'
    Care: Sun, moist to moist well-drained soil. Resistant to Walnut toxicity. Cut back half way in early June to make this shorter and bushier.
    Native: Eastern U.S., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts Monarch, Swallowtail & Red Admiral butterflies

    Named “Joe Pye weed” after a Native American medicine man who used the plant in New England to cure typhus, typhus being named “jopi.” Meskwaki men “nibbled (Joe Pye weed) when speaking to women when they are in the wooing mood.” This had the power of “fetching” women. Introduced to gardens in 1610.

  • Eupatorium sessilifolium Upland boneset Z 3-8

    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    Showy flat-topped, white flower clusters July to September, considered rare and endangered

    Size: 3-4’ x 12-24”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil to dry soil
    Native: most of eastern half of US, Wisconsin native but rare and endangered
    Wildlife Value: Nectar attracts bees and butterflies. Food for caterpillars of several moths. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1753.

  • Filipendula rubra Queen of the Prairie Z 3-9

    Frothy pink plumes in midsummer

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, midsummer

    Size: 4-6’ x 4-5'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: eastern U.S., Wisconsin native

    Name is Latin filum pendulus meaning “hanging by a thread” referring to threads on the roots of Filipendula. Meskwaki Indians used it for heart ailments and as an aphrodisiac.   Grown in American gardens since 1900.

  • Foeniculum vulgaris ‘Purpureum’ Bronze fennel Z 4-9

    Yellow blooms on umbels in late spring into summer

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Yellow blooms on umbels  in late spring into summer, features feathery, compound, aromatic purple leaves with needle-like segments.

    Size: 4-5’x2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and birds. Nectar plant for Swallowtail butterflies.

    We grow it in the butterfly garden.  Used by ancient Egyptians as a food and medicine. Considered a snake bite remedy in ancient China. During the Middle Ages  hung over doorways to drive away evil spirits.  Fennel is also associated with the origin of the marathon. Athenian Pheidippides carried a fennel stalk on his 150 mile, 2 day run to Sparta to gather soldiers for the battle of Marathon with Persia in 490 B.C. The battle itself was also reportedly waged on a field of fennel.  The Gardeners Dictionary: . . . eighth ed.  1768