Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 49–56 of 131 results

  • Eryngium giganteum Miss Wilmott’s ghost SELF-SEEDING BIENNIAL Z 5-8

    In summer, oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, bracts – very ornamental.

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    In summer, oval thistles top prickly green, turning steely blue, silvery, bracts – very ornamental.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained, fertile soil. Be sure to let it drop its seeds & do not weed seedlings out the following spring.
    Native: Caucasus Mountains
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Eryngium is Greek for thistle.  Introduced to England in 1820. Miss Ellen Willmott (1858-1934), a wealthy, eccentric English gardener reputedly dropped seeds as she passed her neighbors’ gardens. The plants came up afterwards, her “ghosts.” Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908.

  • Eryngium maritimum Sea holly Z 5-10

    Round thistles turning steely blue in July-August atop silver colored, prickly bracts. Ivy-shaped prickly foliage.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Round thistles turning steely blue in July-August atop silver colored, prickly bracts. Ivy-shaped prickly foliage.

    Size: 12" x 10"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Seacoasts of Europe

    “Eryngium” is Greek for thistle.  Anglo-Saxons prescribed Sea holly root to cure the king’s evil, serpent bites, broken bones, stiff necks and melancholy. Also considered an aphrodisiac and brought on “kissing comfits.”   This was identified by Dioscorides in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D.  Eryngium was described in Gerard’s Herball  in 1597 for its uses: ”old and aged people that are consumed and withered with age, and which want natural moisture (and also) amended the defects of nature in the younger,”  William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, considered this plant “very pretty.”

  • Eryngium planum Flat sea holly Z 5-9

    Round thistles top prickly steel blue, silver colored, bracts June-August. Stems turn steel blue too.  Deadhead for repeat bloom.  Reseeds readily.  Great cut flowers: dry or fresh…

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Round thistles top prickly steel blue, silver colored, bracts June-August.  Stems turn steel blue too. Deadhead for repeat bloom.  Reseeds readily.  Great cut flowers: dry or fresh.

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Sun well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: E. Europe

    Eryngium is Greek meaning “thistle.” Eryngium was described in Gerard’s Herball in 1597 for its uses: ”old and aged people that are consumed and withered with age, and which want natural moisture (and also) amended the defects of nature in the younger.”

  • Eupatorium coelestinum album syn Conoclinium coelestinum ‘Album’ Mistflower ‘Album’ Z 3-7

    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum - August to October.

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Clusters of white in fall – looks like a big Ageratum – August to October.

    Size: 3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central and Southeastern US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies - nectar source for American painted lady butterfly

    Eupatorium named after Mithridates Eupator, ancient king of Pontus, Greece, said by Pliny to have used another species of Eupatorium medicinally in 1st century B.C.  ‘Album’ first published in 1940.

  • Euphorbia corollata Flowering spurge Z 4-7

    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby's breath but better, July & August.  One of the best prairie natives, but slow to mature.

    $9.25/pot

    Buy

    Small white flowers (bracts), like a baby’s breath but better, July & August. One of the best prairie natives but slow to mature.

    Size: 36' x 24" spreading slowly
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought resistant.
    Native: Canada to Florida and west through the plains, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant. Its pollen & nectar feed endangered Karner Blue butterfly as well as other small butterflies, numerous bees, wasps and flies. Several birds eat the seeds.

    A favorite medicine among native Americans.  Cherokee rubbed the plant’s juice on skin to cure cancer.  Also used to remedy tooth aches and gonorrhea.  Winnebago cut a 2.5” long root to clear stomach and steeped leaves for a baby’s colic. According to Breck (1851), “One of the most elegant species peculiar to the United States.”

  • Euphorbia marginata Snow-on-the-mountain reseeding ANNUAL Let seeds fall in autumn

    Clean white variegated leaves and flowers (bracts), very showy midsummer to fall. Use caution with internal milky sap.

    $4.95/pot

    Buy

    Clean white variegated leaves and flowers (bracts), very showy midsummer to fall. Use caution with internal milky sap.

    Size: 18” x 10”
    Care: sun moist well-drained soil, drought tolerant.
    Native: Plains from Dakota to Texas
    Size: Wonderful cut flower just be careful of the milky sap.

    Sioux crushed leaves in water and boiled it for a liniment to remedy swelling; boiled whole leaves in water to increase milk for new mothers.  Collected on Lewis and Clark expedition three times, once July 28, 1806 along Marias River.  A “most elegant species.” Breck, 1851.

  • Euphorbia myrsinites Donkeytail spurge Z 5-8

    Chartreuse umbels at stem tips contrast succulent blue-gray foliage in early spring

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Chartreuse umbels at stem tips contrast succulent blue-gray foliage in early spring

    Can not ship to: Colorado.

    Size: 4” x 12”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western Asia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Euphorbia was named for Euphorbus, physician of Numibian King Juba (c. 50 B.C. – 20 A.D.)  Reputedly Euphorbus used  spurge to remedy the King’s enlarged stomach.   Euphorbus’ brother was Augustus Caesar’s physician.  Myrsinites is a Greek word meaning “resembling myrtle.”  This plant described by Swiss botanical scholar Conrad Gesner in his book Horti Germaniae published in 1541.

  • Euphorbia polychroma Cushion spurge syn. Euphorbia epithymoides Z 4-9

    May - June flashy chartreuse flowers.  In fall foliage turns orangey-red.

    $12.25/bareroot

    Buy

    May – June flashy chartreuse flowers.  In fall foliage turns orangey-red.

    Size: 16" x 24"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained humusy soil.
    Native: Central and Southern Europe
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Polychroma means many colors referring to the fact that the foliage changes colors.  Named by Linnaeus 1753.