Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 9–12 of 135 results

  • Allium flavum var. minus Yellow flowered garlic

    Umbels of shatter-shot yellow florets on blue-green stems in July

    $6.45/bareroot

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    Allium flavum var. minus  Z 4-7
    Umbels of shatter-shot yellow florets, a bit like fireworks, on blue-green stems  in July

    Size: 10” x 3”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Turkey
    Wildlife Value: resistant to rabbits & deer. Attracts bees and butterflies
    Awards: species received Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Swiss botanist Pierre Edmond Boissier before 1885

  • Allium senescens Corkscrew allium, German garlic, Greater mountain garlic Z 4-9

    Lavender balls, up to 30 of them, atop thin, bluish, strap-like, twisting foliage – mid-summer day’s dream.

    $5.95/bareroot

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    Allium senescens  Corkscrew allium, German garlic, Greater mountain garlic Z 4-9
    Lavender balls, up to 30 of them, atop thin, bluish, strap-like, twisting foliage – mid-summer day’s dream.

    Size: 6-12” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Siberia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & bees, deer & rabbit resistant

    Cultivated before 1753. According to Philip Miller’s 1768 Dictionary, “planted in gardens for the variety of their flowers.”

  • Amsonia orientalis syn. Rhazya orientalis European bluestar Z 5-8

    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Amsonia orientalis syn. Rhazya orientalis    European bluestar   Z 5-8
    “Immensely tough and useful filler” “100 Plants Every Gardener Should Grow,” Gardens Illustrated No. 231
    Purplish blue flowers that are larger and longer lasting than other Amsonia. Yellow foliage in Fall.

    Size: 12-20” x spreading
    Care: sun to light shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey

    Deer resistant, salt and heat tolerant.   Classified as critically endangered as it is losing its native habitat and was over harvested. Collected before 1844.

  • Anchusa capensis Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss

    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall

    $5.25/4" pot

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    Anchusa capensis  Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss  Z 6-9 self-seeding annual in colder areas
    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall.  Do you need to know anything else?

    Size: 8” x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: So. Africa.
    Awards: Plant Select® Central Rocky Mountain region

    Collected and introduced to Europe in 1794 by von Thunberg (1743-1828). Carl Peter von Thunberg, student of Linnaeus at Uppsala University in Sweden, made three trips to the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775 where he collected about 1000 new species, Java and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) 1777 and 15 months in Japan where he befriended local doctors who gave him hundreds of plants new to Western horticulture.  He succeeded Linnaeus as professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala and King Gustav beknighted him.   Young Cape forget-me-not plants were eaten as a vegetable, Annals of the South African Museum, 1898.  Louise Beebe Wilder loved this plant, effusing, “One of the prettiest (blue annuals) is the Cape Forget-me-not.  Not one of its cerulean family boasts a purer blue and its summer-long period of bloom and indifference to drought make it a really valuable annual.  It has also a sturdy habit of growth and sowing its hardy seeds freely it does its best to become a permanent resident.”  Robinson called it “Remarkably fine…” The Garden 1873.  The name Anchusa from anchousa paint used on skin.