Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 41–48 of 131 results

  • Dianthus deltoides Maiden pink Z 3-9

    May - June and longer if deadhead   bright pink or white

    $9.25/pot

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    May – June and longer if deadhead, bright pink or white

    Size: 8”x 12”
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil, slightly alkaline
    Native: Scotland to Norway
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Deltoides refers to the inverted V-shaped pocket at the base of the petals. D. deltoides 1st identified in 1671 by Pinax. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

  • Dianthus pinifolius Pineleaf garden pink Z 4-9

    Crimson clusters on wiry stems high above narrow-leaved, glaucous foliage, blooming in late spring to early summer

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    Crimson clusters on wiry stems high above narrow-leaved, galucious foliage, blooming in late spring to early summer

    Size: 12” x 6”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Balkan Peninsula & Romania

    Described before 1796.

  • Dictamnus fraxinella syn. D. alba Gas plant, Burning bush Z 3-9

    Magestic white or pink spikes of flowers in early summer, glossy, lemon-scented leaves

    $9.95/POT

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    Magestic white or pink spikes of flowers in early summer, glossy, lemon scented leaves.

    Size: 2-3' x 2' slow growing
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Host for Giant Swallowtail caterpillars. Rabbit & deer resistant.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Dictamnus is from the mountain Dicte, located in Crete.  Popular Elizabethan cottage garden plant since the late 1500’s.  Gerard called it a “gallant plant.” Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Grown by Jefferson at Monticello in the “center of the NW shrub circle,”1807. The roots used medicinally “resisting purification and poison.”  Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768. Once established very long-lived plant, “known to stand on the same place for fifty years still bearing healthy blooms.” The Garden Feb 19, 1876.

  • Diervilla lonicera Northern bush honeysuckle Z 3-7

    Lemon yellow flowers on this short shrub June to August. In fall its foliage turns dark red for the final fireworks’ display. Great shrub for tough, dry shady areas.

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Lemon yellow flowers on this short shrub June to August.  In fall its foliage turns dark red for the final fireworks’ display.  Great shrub for tough, dry shady areas.

    Size: 3’ x 3’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern half of US & Canada, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: nectar source for Bumblebees. Birds make nests from the branches and eat the fruits

    Used medicinally by numerous Native Americans – Algonquin, Chippewa, Cree, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki, Ojibwa and Potawatomi.  Used as remedy for sore eyes, diuretic, “old men who cannot retain urine,” constipation, stomach pain, increase breast milk, to “spoiled babies with adulterous mother,” STDs, and vertigo. Native American Ethnobotany.  Botanist to France’s king, Tournefort named this to honor Dr. N. Dierville, a surgeon, who carried this from Acadia (Canada) to France in 1699.

  • Dracocephalum ruyschianum Northern dragonhead, Siberian dragonhead Z 4-8

    Mound of sky blue, snapdragon-like flowers, July-September over narrow rosemaryish leaves

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    Mound of sky blue, snapdragon-like flowers, July-September over narrow rosemaryish leaves.

    Size: 12- 18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: China, Siberia
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant

    Dracocephalum means “dragonhead” in Greek. Collected before 1753.

  • Echinops ritro Globe thistle Z 3-9

    Mid to late summer, round, steel blue flower heads, great dried flowers

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Mid to late summer, round, steel blue flower heads at 1st prickly then turning soft and fuzzy.   Great cut flower – fresh or dried.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: Southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts American painted lady butterflies

    The name Echinops is Greek meaning “like a hedgehog” describing the circular spiny thistles.   Introduced to England in 1570.  By the last half of the 1800’s the Globe thistle became a popular Victorian flower. Cultivated by Washington at Mount Vernon.

  • Epimedium x rubrum syn. Epimedium alpinum var. rubrum Red barrenwort Z 4-8

    small, star-shaped, rosey-red flowers dance on the ends of wiry-thin stems

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    In mid-spring small, star-shaped, rosey-red flowers dance on the ends of wiry-thin stems about one foot high. Red-flushed foliage follows the flowers, the more sun, the more red on leaves.  Wonderful groundcover.  Cross between Epimedium grandiflorum and Epimedium alpinum

    Size: 16” x 24” slow spreading
    Care: Sun to shade in most any soil but best in part shade – one of most adaptable plants
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanic Garden Great Plant Pick

    1st described in 1853 in Belgique Hort. iii. 33. I. 6.

  • Erigeron compositus Cutleaf daisy, Dwarf mountain fleabane Z 3-8

    Cushion shaped plant with wooly grey leaves topped by small bluish, pink or white rays like a daisy with a yellow center. Flowers in June-July.

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    Cushion shaped plant with wooly grey leaves topped by small bluish, pink or white rays like a daisy with a yellow center. Flowers in June-July.

    Size: 6” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: all of western No. America from prairies to alpine slopes.

    Thompson Indians from British Columbia chewed on the plant then spit on sores to remedy skin ailments.  They also made a decoction of the plant, mixed with any weeds for broken bones.  Collected by Meriwether Lewis in late spring 1806 near Lewiston Idaho.  Erigeron comes from Greek er meaning “spring” and geron for “old man” due to some of these species having white downy hair like an old man.