Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 29–32 of 144 results

  • Buddleja davidii Butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall. Monarch magnet.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Very fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall.  Monarch magnet.

    Can not ship to: Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Washington

    Size: 6' x 5'
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Cut it back near the ground in spring. Drought tolerant.
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    First discovered by Pére Armand David, French missionary to China who risked his life in the search for plants during 3 expeditions to China from 1866 – 1872. Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson found and introduced several cultivars around 1900 popularizing the shrub.

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Callirhoe involucrata Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow

    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June - October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June – October, non-stop.  Wonderful for rock gardens or as a ground cover.

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Missouri to Texas

    Although an American prairie native, Callirhoe is named for the daughter of the Greek river god. Teton Dakota burned its dried root for smoke to cure the common cold and aches and pains. First collected by Thomas Nuttall in 1834. Ferry’s 1876 catalog described it as having “a trailing habit, of great beauty.” William Robinson extolled Prairie mallow as “excellent for the rock garden, bearing a continuous crop of showy blossoms from early summer till late in autumn.”

  • Celastrus scandens Bittersweet, Staff vine VINE Z 4-8

    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter on the females of this native vine.

    Size: 20-30' x 6'
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil except wet
    Native: Eastern half of US west to South Dakota & south to NM

    Ointment made from bark simmered with a pound of lard remedied “swelling breasts, discuss or drive away tumors, swellings and piles.”  Cherokee drank a tea for stomach ailments.  HoChunk included root in a compound to cure colds.  Collected by Rev. John Banister in 1670’s.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.