Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 13–16 of 144 results

  • Anchusa capensis Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss

    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall

    $5.25/pot

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    Anchusa capensis  Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss  Z 6-9 self-seeding annual in colder areas
    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall.  Do you need to know anything else?

    Size: 8” x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: So. Africa.
    Awards: Plant Select® Central Rocky Mountain region

    Collected and introduced to Europe in 1794 by von Thunberg (1743-1828). Carl Peter von Thunberg, student of Linnaeus at Uppsala University in Sweden, made three trips to the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775 where he collected about 1000 new species, Java and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) 1777 and 15 months in Japan where he befriended local doctors who gave him hundreds of plants new to Western horticulture.  He succeeded Linnaeus as professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala and King Gustav beknighted him.   Young Cape forget-me-not plants were eaten as a vegetable, Annals of the South African Museum, 1898.  Louise Beebe Wilder loved this plant, effusing, “One of the prettiest (blue annuals) is the Cape Forget-me-not.  Not one of its cerulean family boasts a purer blue and its summer-long period of bloom and indifference to drought make it a really valuable annual.  It has also a sturdy habit of growth and sowing its hardy seeds freely it does its best to become a permanent resident.”  Robinson called it “Remarkably fine…” The Garden 1873.  The name Anchusa from anchousa paint used on skin.

  • Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Blue gray foliage turns plum orange in fall

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Andropogon scoparium  Little bluestem  Z 5-9
    Blue gray  foliage turns plum orange in fall  with wispy, feather-like seed heads

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    Discovered by French plant hunter André Michaux (1746-1802) in America’s prairies.  Comanche used it to relieve syphilitic sores.  Lakota made soft wispy seed heads into liners for moccasins.

  • Antennaria dioica Pussy toes Z 5-9

    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot

    $6.95/pot

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    Antennaria dioica   Pussy toes   Z 5-9
    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot, flowers in early summer, great silvery-gray foliage, good groundcover and rock garden plant.

    Size: 2” x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Temperate areas worldwide

    Antennaria from the Latin antenna originally referring to the mast of a sailboat.  Part of the flower supposedly resembles a butterfly’s antennae.  Historically used for medicine as an astringent, a cough remedy and to break fever.  First described by German physician and botanical author Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566).  Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931), mother of the mixed perennial border, planted this in her own rock garden at Munstead Wood and in the Sundial Garden at Pednor House in Buckinghamshire. The pink version, A. dioica rosea, collected in the Rocky Mountains by C.C. Parry before 1860.

  • Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon Z 5-8

    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring, repeats in fall. Fuzzy, silver-grey foliage

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    Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon  Z 5-8
    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring and repeats in fall. Fuzzy, glaucous, silver-grey foliage. Excellent for places you want low-growing, drought tolerant flowers.

    Size: 12” x 2’
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain & Morocco
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, attracts hummingbirds

    Described in 1852 in Pugillus Plantarum Novarum Africae Borealis Hispaniaeque Australis