Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 25–32 of 145 results

  • Aurinia saxitilis Basket of Gold Z 4-7

    Taxi cab yellow flowers envelope the plant from May to June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Taxi cab yellow flowers envelop the plant from May to June

    Size: 10" x 12"
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil, cut back after flowering to maintain compact form. Drought tolerant
    Native: Central and southeastern Europe
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    The ancient Greeks may have used this to cure hydrophobia. English garden cultivation since 1710. American garden cultivation since 1700’s. Grown by Washington at Mount Vernon. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908.

  • Baptisia australis False Indigo Z 3-9

    Indigo blue racemes in June followed by ornamental pods

    $11.95/bareroot

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    In early summer loose spikes bear big blue blossoms which turn to large black seed pods. Four foot tall foliage resembles a shrub.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Full sun sandy soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern United States, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of Year 2010

    As its common name describes, this plant was used as a substitute for indigo dye. Horticultural greats Bailey, Breck and Robinson considered Baptisia handsome. Introduced in 1758.

  • Baptisia leucantha White Wild Indigo Z 3-9

    Georgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Gorgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms in May & June followed by ornamental pods

    Size: 3-5' x 2-3'
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: from Minnesota to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the HoChunk “(t)he root is a single remedy to use for injured womb alone. Cook the root and mash it to form a poltice to bind on. Wash with water and draw out the inflammation.”

  • Baptisia sphaerocarpa Yellow wild indigo Z 5-8

    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers, a legume, in spring.

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Missouri to Mississippi to TX

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Sphaerocarpa means “round seed.”  Collected by English planthunter Thomas Nuttall before 1834.

  • Buddleja davidii Butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall. Monarch magnet.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Very fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall.  Monarch magnet.

    Can not ship to: Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Washington

    Size: 6' x 5'
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Cut it back near the ground in spring. Drought tolerant.
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    First discovered by Pére Armand David, French missionary to China who risked his life in the search for plants during 3 expeditions to China from 1866 – 1872. Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson found and introduced several cultivars around 1900 popularizing the shrub.

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Callirhoe involucrata Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow

    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June - October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June – October, non-stop.  Wonderful for rock gardens or as a ground cover.

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Missouri to Texas

    Although an American prairie native, Callirhoe is named for the daughter of the Greek river god. Teton Dakota burned its dried root for smoke to cure the common cold and aches and pains. First collected by Thomas Nuttall in 1834. Ferry’s 1876 catalog described it as having “a trailing habit, of great beauty.” William Robinson extolled Prairie mallow as “excellent for the rock garden, bearing a continuous crop of showy blossoms from early summer till late in autumn.”

  • Celastrus scandens Bittersweet, Staff vine VINE Z 4-8

    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Conspicuous orange fruit in autumn, persisting into winter on the females of this native vine.

    Size: 20-30' x 6'
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil except wet
    Native: Eastern half of US west to South Dakota & south to NM

    Ointment made from bark simmered with a pound of lard remedied “swelling breasts, discuss or drive away tumors, swellings and piles.”  Cherokee drank a tea for stomach ailments.  HoChunk included root in a compound to cure colds.  Collected by Rev. John Banister in 1670’s.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.