Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 17–24 of 145 results

  • Arabis caucasica syn. A. alpina subsp. caucasica Alpine Rock Cress Z 4-9

    Late spring white four-petaled racemes

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    Arabis caucasica syn. A. alpina subsp. caucasica Alpine Rock Cress  Z 4-9
    Late spring white four-petaled racemes.

    Size: 6-12”x 20” spreads
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil, vigorous; cut back after flowering to make it full.
    Native: Southern Europe and Mediterranean.
    Size: Perfect for a dry border or rock garden. Drought tolerant.

    Arabis is Greek for Arabian. Cultivated in the U.S. since 1800’s.

  • Armeria pseudoarmeria syn. A. formosa syn. A. latifolia, A. alpina Giant thrift Z 5-7

    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Armeria pseudoarmeria syn. A. formosa syn. A. latifolia, A alpina Giant thrift    Z 5-7 
    Carmine-pink balls atop foliage like a clump of grass flowering in June and sporadically all summer

    Size: 12” x 8”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, heat and drought tolerant
    Native: So. Europe

    In gardens since 1740. Per Wm Robinson this plant: “one of the best hardy flowers from southern Europe and should be in every collection.”

  • Artemisia ludoviciana Silver sage, Wormwood Z 4-9

    Grown for its silver-grey foliage

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    Artemisia ludoviciana Silver sage, Wormwood    Z 4-9
    Grown for its silver-grey foliage in the garden & dried in arrangements

    Size: 3’ x 2’ and spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Colorado south to Texas, west to California.

    Blackfoot cleaned themselves with this as part of religious rituals.  California’s Shasta Indians prepared dead bodies to be buried with the leaves.  HoChunk made a smudge to revive the unconscious.  Cahuilla Indians made baskets and roofs and walls of their homes with the stems.  First collected for gardens by Thomas Nuttall in early 1800’s.  Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia. Miller 1768.

  • Artemisia stellerana Beach wormwood, Dusty miller Z 3-7

    Intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    $11.95/pot

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    Grown for its intricate, embroidery-like, felty-white foliage

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 24” x 12”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: naturalized in North America from Massachusetts to Delaware

    Artemisia named for the wife of Mausolus, king of Caria, who began using another Artemisia.  Miller 1768. Collected from the wild by 1842.  Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll to use on the edges of gardens, 1908   L.H. Bailey (1933) described it as “attractive for its whiteness.  Useful for borders.”

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly weed, Pleurisy-root Z 4-9

    striking orange cymes in July-August

    $8.75/pot

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    Striking orange cymes in July-August on this American native.

    Size: 2-3' x 12"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to dry soil, Drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: East and south North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: host for Monarch & Gray hairstreak butterfly caterpillars.

    Omaha Indian’s Shell Society took 4 days to dig, prepare and distribute the root to cure bronchial and pulmonary ailments. Most important medicine for the Menomonie. Iroquois smashed the root on runner’s legs to give them strength. Butterfly weed cured flu and remedied coyote bites for the Iroquios. 1st collected for gardens by Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia in 1678 He died when he bent over to collect a plant and a gunman mistakenly shot him. Jefferson grew this at Monticello.

  • Aster alpinus Alpine Aster Z 5-7

    Frilly little daisies, May-June, lavender, pink or white

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Frilly little daisies, May-June, lavender, pink or white. Plant where they’ll be seen in the front of the garden.  Also good in rock gardens

    Size: 6-10" x 18"
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & tolerant of Black walnut toxins
    Native: Rockies
    Wildlife Value: attract butterflies

    Aster means star referring to the flower form. Collected by Drummond in the Rockies by 1800.

  • Aster cordifolium Blue wood aster Z 3-8

    Blue daisies late summer into fall - sun to shade

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Heart-shaped foliage smothered with blue daisies from late summer to fall, perfect companion for anemones


    Care: Sun to shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Canada to Florida, west to Oklahoma, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Nectar source for many butterflies

    1st described by Jacques Philippe Cornuti in 1635.  Likely collected and transported to France by Samuel de Champlain.  Grown in Jardin du Roi in Paris.

  • Aster sibiricus syn. Eurybia sibirica Siberian aster, Arctic aster Z 3-9

    Lavender daisies from late-summer into fall

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    Aster sibiricus  syn. Eurybia sibirica  Siberian aster, Arctic aster Z 3-9
    Lavender daisies from late-summer into fall, valuable for long-blooming and short size

    Size: 6-10” x 15-24” Care: sun in well-drained, to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: NW US, Alaska, Canada, Arctic & Siberia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Collected by German plant hunter Johann Gmelin in Siberia before 1753