Prairie Plants

Showing 25–32 of 92 results

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.75/pot

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    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Carex davalliana Bath’s sedge, Davall’s sedge Z 4-8

    Short hedge-hog like clump with white flowers

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    Short hedge-hog like clump with white flowers turning to bronzy spiked seedheads May-June. Best for rock, railroad or fairy gardens – anyplace for a miniature, clumping grass.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: sun to light shade in moist soil
    Native: wet places in Europe and western No. America

    Collected before 1798 by Edmund Davall who botanized in Switzerland.

  • Carex grayi Gray’s Sedge Z 3-8

    Club-like maces in June through fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Flowers look like club-like maces in June to December.  This one will make your friends & neighbors ask “what the heck is it?”

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Vermont west to Wisconsin, south to Georgia and Missouri

    Collected before 1880.

  • Carex rosea Rosy sedge, Stellate sedge PERENNIAL GRASS Z 3-9

    Mounds of thinnest of medium green leaves mingled with stems with star shaped seed clusters in May-June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Mounds of thinnest of medium green leaves mingled with stems with star shaped seed clusters in May-June.

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade and shade in moist well-drained soil
    Wildlife Value: No. Dakota south to TX & east incl. WI, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.
    Awards: Great Plants for the Great Plains Grass of the Year 2020

    Collected before 1811.

  • Ceanothus americanus New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea Z 4-8

    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

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    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-5’
    Care: full sun in fertile, well-drained soil
    Native: eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for Spring Azure, Summer Azure, Mottled Duskywing butterflies. Birds eat the Seeds. Supports over 30 bee species.

    Native Americans used Ceanothus americanus to wash injured feet and to cure toothaches, constipation and short breath. Sent to England around 1715 by Mark Catesby, English naturalist.   Leaves used extensively to make tea during the American Revolution. Twigs made a cinnamon-colored dye. Cherokee cooked a medicinal tea from the roots to cure toothaches and stomach ailments. Jefferson grew this as part of a shrubbery west of the house at Monticello in 1771.

  • Clematis virginiana Virgin’s bower, Devil’s darning needles Z 4-8

    July-September star-like white blossoms

    $15.95/bareroot

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    July-September star-like white blossoms cover this vine – good for clambering up small trees.

    Size: 12-20’ x 4’
    Care: Sun to shade moist well-drained soil. Flowers on new stems so cut back in late winter or early spring to 6-8” above the ground.
    Native: Nova Scotia to Georgia and as far west as Kansas, Wisconsin native

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant. One of 1st No. American plants sent to Europe – grew in Tradescant the Elder’s South Lambeth nursery in 1634.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello in 1807.  Described by Breck in his 1851 book The Flower Garden: “The flowers are white borne upon cymes, and make a handsome appearance.”  Cherokee mixed this plant with milkweed to remedy backaches.  A root extract cured stomach aches, nervous conditions and kidney ailments.  For the Iroquois powdered root fixed venereal disease sores and an extract of the stem brought on strange dreams.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Cornus alternifolia Pagoda dogwood Z 4-7

    Small tree with horizontal branches in flat tiers & a flat top, like the roof of a pagoda, bearing fragrant white flowers in early summer & blue berries on red stems against maroon leaves in fall.

    $19.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Small tree with horizontal branches in flat tiers & a flat top, like the roof of a pagoda, bearing fragrant white flowers in early summer & blue berries on red stems against maroon leaves in fall.

    Size: 15-30’ x 15-30’
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil – great understory tree.
    Native: Canada to GA, west to MN – WI native
    Wildlife Value: Spring azure butterfly caterpillar. 34+ birds (incl. Northern flicker, Woodpeckers & Bluebirds,) eat the fruits.
    Awards: Great Plants for Great Plains

    Alternifolia means leaves alternating on stem. Collected before 1753. Cherokee chewed bark for headaches, sore throat, worms, measles & diarrhea. Poltice topically applied on ulcers & a decoction for colds & cough.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Dalea aurea syn Parosela aurea Golden prairie clover Z 5-9

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

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    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’
    Care: sun in dry soil
    Native: West US from TX to WY
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies
    Size: Native Americans used Golden Prairie-clover to treat diarrhea and colic

    Collected and described by Thomas Nuttall, 1813.