Prairie Plants

Showing 81–88 of 92 results

  • Rudbeckia triloba Branched coneflower, Brown eyed susan Z 3-9

    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones from August to October.  Wonderful cut flower.

    Size: 4' x 3'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Walnut toxins
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies Award: 1996 - Georgia Gold Medal winner.

    Rudbeckia was named by Linnaeus for his University of Upsala professor,Olaf Rudbeck.  Rudbeck made the surprising claim “that the Paradise of Scripture was situated somewhere in Sweden.”   C.F. Leyel. This species collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister by 1670.

  • Ruellia humilis Prairie petunia Z 5-9

    lilac trumpets all summer and fall

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Lilac trumpets with dark pink veins all summer non-stop. Very long blooming but slow to emerge in spring.

    Size: 8-10" x 24"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Midwest south to Florida and Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Ruellia  named for French royal herbalist Jean Ruell (1474-1537).  This species first collected by Thomas Nuttall, English plant hunter who found more American plants than anyone else, early 1800’s.

  • Silphium perfoliatum Cup plant Z 3-9

    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

    Can not ship to: Connecticut and New York

    Size: 7’ x 3’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Central North America, native to Wisconsin.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Sap used by Native Americans to chew and freshen breath.  Also used to cure colds, neuralgia, fever, and liver disorders.  The Chippewa used to stop lung hemorrhaging, menstrual bleeding and cure chest pain.  The Winnebago drank a potion from the plant to purify themselves before a buffalo hunt.  For the Iroquois it cured paralysis, prevented children from seeing ghosts and illness caused by the dead.  Goldfinches feast on the seeds in fall.

  • Solidago caesia syn. Solidago axillaris Blue-stemmed goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod Z 4-9

    arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Graceful, arching wands of clustered gold, with contrasting blue-green stems, in September-October. Clump forming, noninvasive perennial.

    Size: 18-24” x 16-20”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to WI, south to FL and west to TX
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet

    The Latin name is a combination of solidus and ago, meaning “I make whole”, referring to its historic medicinal uses. According to William Cullina it  has antioxidant, diuretic, astringent and antifungal properties and is supposed to be used to treat urinary tract and yeast infections, sore throats and diarrhea. (W. Cullina, NEWFS, p. 197)  Collected before 1753.

  • Solidago graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod Z 3-9

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

    Size: 2-3' x 1-2'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia across Canada, S. to FL., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts praying mantises and butterflies.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to “bring together.” Gramnifolia  means “grass-leaved.”  Since 1750’s.

  • Solidago riddellii syn. Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod Z. 3-7

    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.- loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulphur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent, & Cloudless sulphur.   Attracts praying mantises.

    Size: 3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: swath down middle of No. Am. From Hudson Bay to AK, incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and praying mantis. Deer resistant.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together. Collected by 1835.

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.  Not invasive.

    Size: 5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil
    Native: Central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning “to bring together.”
    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859.)

  • Sporobolus heterolepsis Prairie dropseed Zone 3 – 9

    Mound of graceful thinnest of grass blades

    $11.95/bareroot

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    The description in the Chiltern Seeds catalog cannot be improved:  “This is the most elegant and refined of the North American prairie grasses …the finest texture composed of the thinnest of thin, thread-like, glossy green blades,.. in autumn turning deep orange before fading to a light copper for the winter.  In late summer the plants bear, on very slender stalks high above the foliage, unbelievably delicate, graceful flower panicles, excellent for cutting.”

    Size: 2’ x 2’
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: from Canada in the north to Texas in the south, Wisconsin native

    Sporobolos is Greek from sporo meaning seed and ballein meaning to cast forth because the seed readily falls from the flower (or dropseed, the common name).  Ojibwa “Medicine Society” used roots to cure sores & “remove bile.”