Prairie Plants

Showing 73–80 of 92 results

  • Penstemon tubaeflorus Great Plains Beardtongue 4-8

    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.  One of the most reliable, long lived penstemons.

    Size: 36"x 15"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central Plains N., S. to TX & NE to Maine, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek.  Collected by Englishman Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) who searched entire No. American continent – parts of Canada, from New England west to Oregon, the South, Midwest, the Plains, the S.E., California & Hawaii, finding hundreds of new plants.

  • Phlox buckleyi Sword leaf Phlox Z 4-8

    Sprays of mauve, pink or purple in May-June

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Sprays of mauve, pink or purple in May-June

    Size: 8- 18” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Virginia & West Virginia

    Described and named by Edgar Theodore Wherry (1885-1982), unflagging naturalist in the finest tradition of wide interests in the natural world.  After getting his Ph.D in 1909 in geology-mineralogy he became Asst. Curator of Minerals for the Smithsonian.  In 8 years he transferred to the USDA Bureau of Chemistry, becoming its principal chemist.  He left in 1930 to accept an appointment as botany professor at U. Penn., where he taught botany and ecology for 25 years.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Pulsatilla patens syn. Anemone patens Eastern pasque flower Z 3-7

    Very hard to find, native Pasque flower.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Up-facing blue-violet bells in early spring emerge from foliage decorated with silky hairs.

    Size: 8-12” -12"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: northern Great Plains including WI, Siberia, Alaska

    The name Pasque is Old French for Easter referring to the spring bloom time. Patens means “spreading.”  South Dakota honors this as its state flower.
    Collected for gardens prior to 1753.  The Blackfoot made a decoction of this plant to speed a baby’s delivery and applied crushed leaves to skin to remedy irritation.  Omaha applied fresh, crushed leaves as a poltice for rheumatism.

  • Pulsatilla vulgaris Pasque flower Z 4-8

    Deep purple spring bells

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Deep purple spring bells off-set yellow centers, followed by ornamental spider-like seed heads.  These take 3 years to flower.  Our plants are 2-3 years old.

    Size: 8" x 8"
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe

    Cultivated in Europe since at least medieval times and possibly used by the Druids in the festival of the dawn goddess. Jefferson planted the Pasque flower in 1771.

  • Pulsatilla vulgaris var. rubra syn. Anemone pulsatilla var. rubra Pasqueflower

    Wine-red petals of bell-shape with yellow centers flowers in early spring. Fun, furry foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Wine-red petals of bell-shape with yellow centers flowers in early spring. Fun, furry foliage and Medusa-like seed heads.

    Size: 12-20” x 4-8”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant

    Called Pasque flower because it blooms at Easter time. William Robinson 1933

  • Pycanthemum virginianum Mountain mint Z 4-8

    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms, leaves fragrant.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Corymbs of numerous white blossoms in August, leaves fragrant, like mint.

    Size: 3' x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Wisconsin native, Eastern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Pycanthemum is Greek meaning “dense blossom.” Chippewa used it to stop menstrual flow, cure chills and fever and to season meat. The plant gave the Meskwaki energy and lured minks into traps.

  • Ratibida pinnata Prairie coneflower Z 3-8

    drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Skirt of drooping, sunny, thin petals surround erect brown cone on this flower, June-August.  Flower is fragrant, smells of anise.

    Size: 3-4' x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Ontario, VT to FL, SD to OK, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies. Birds eat seeds.

    Pinnata means “feathery” in Latin referring to the thin petals of the flower.  1st Americans cured toothaches with the root & made tea from the cone and leaves.  Collected by French explorer Michaux on the prairies of Illinois in 1795.

  • Rudbeckia subtomentosa Sweet coneflower Z 4-8

    Yellow daisies with purplish brown cone July-October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Yellow daisies with purplish brown cone, July – October – tall version of Black-eyed susan. Excellent cut flower, fragrant.

    Size: 4-5' x 1-2'
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: East US, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterfleis

    Common name sweet refers to fragrance of flowers.
    Collected by 1815, maybe by Bradbury.