Prairie Plants

Showing 17–24 of 92 results

  • Baptisia leucantha White Wild Indigo Z 3-9

    Georgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms

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    Gorgeous creamy white spikes of pea-like blooms in May & June followed by ornamental pods

    Size: 3-5' x 2-3'
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: from Minnesota to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the HoChunk “(t)he root is a single remedy to use for injured womb alone. Cook the root and mash it to form a poltice to bind on. Wash with water and draw out the inflammation.”

  • Baptisia sphaerocarpa Yellow wild indigo Z 5-8

    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers

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    Spikes of yellow pea-like flowers, a legume, in spring.

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry soil
    Native: Missouri to Mississippi to TX

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Sphaerocarpa means “round seed.”  Collected by English planthunter Thomas Nuttall before 1834.

  • Baptisia tinctoria Wild indigo, Horsefly Z. 3-9

    Sweet saffron yellow pea-like flowers, July to September

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    Sweet saffron yellow pea-like flowers, July to September

    Size: 2-3’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in dry to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Ontario, Maine to MN S to GA, Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies.

    Baptisia is Greek meaning “to dye” referring to use of Baptisia australis as a substitute for indigo dye. Tinctoria means used in dying. For Cherokee it induced vomiting. They made a poultice to “stop mortification.” The root, held against teeth, remedied toothache. Iroquois used it to cure rheumatism and cramps in the stomach or legs. The Cherokee & Ojibwa used it for dye. Collected by John Banister in Virginia by 1692. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Boltonia asteroides False starwort, Bolton’s aster Z 4-9

    Profuse small white daisies cover this 6 foot tall Midwestern native.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    A cloud of profuse, spectacular small white daisies cover this 6 foot tall Midwestern native. Exceptional because it flowers in fall when yellows and purples predominate, making its white stand out. Great cut flower.

    Size: 6' x 4'
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant. If you want shorter plants cut back halfway in early to mid June.
    Native: Kansas and Missouri to Arkansas
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced to gardens in 1759. Named in honor of 18th century English botanist, James Bolton.

  • Bouteloua gracilis syn. Bouteloua oligostachya Blue grama Z 4-9

    Shortish grass with spikelets like fake eyelashes - very cute

    $11.95/bareroot

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    One sided, horizontal, purple tinged spikelets in July-September, very unusual.

    Size: 2' x 12"
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Manitoba & all US except SE & Pacific NW, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    For the Navajo this was a “life medicine” and an antidote to an overdose of “life medicine.”  Also used to cure sore throats and cuts – chew on the root and blow on the cut.  Navajo girls carried it in the Squaw Dance.  Hopi made baskets from this grass.  Zuni made brooms & hairbrushes from it.  Several tribes ate this & made bedding for their animals from this.  1st collected for horticulture by Humboldt & Bonpland in early 1800’s.

  • Callirhoe involucrata Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow

    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June - October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June – October, non-stop.  Wonderful for rock gardens or as a ground cover.

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Missouri to Texas

    Although an American prairie native, Callirhoe is named for the daughter of the Greek river god. Teton Dakota burned its dried root for smoke to cure the common cold and aches and pains. First collected by Thomas Nuttall in 1834. Ferry’s 1876 catalog described it as having “a trailing habit, of great beauty.” William Robinson extolled Prairie mallow as “excellent for the rock garden, bearing a continuous crop of showy blossoms from early summer till late in autumn.”

  • Calylophus serrulatus Yellow sundrops, Shrubby evening primrose Z 4-9

    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

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    Lemon yellow silky petals bloom late spring to early fall on this tough-as-nails native

    Size: 9-18” x 12-15”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Great Plains: Central Canada to TX, Michigan to Montana, WI native

    1st described in 1818 by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter who collected hundreds of “new” plants in North America. Caly is Greek for calyx; lophos for “the back of the neck; crest of a hill or helmet”  serrulatus means “minutely serrate” or “saw-toothed” describing the leaf margins.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.