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  • Actaea pachypoda syn. Actaea alba White baneberry Z 3-8

    Short white spike flowers in June, conspicuous white berries in fall with a black dot on showy crimson stems.

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    Actaea pachypoda syn. Actaea alba White baneberry Z 3-8
    Short white spike flowers in June, conspicuous white berries in fall with a black dot on showy crimson stems.

    Size: 36”x 18-24”
    Care: part to full shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: native to eastern and central No. America; Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit and Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.

    Actaea is Latin meaning “elder,” the leaves resembling the elder tree. Pachypoda means thick foot referring to the stalk. The common name “baneberry” chosen because the berries are poisonous. The Blackfoot boiled the roots to cure coughs and colds. In the 1800’s, used to cure “reflex uterine headache, rheumatism, congestion in the female especially, debility and gastralgia.” Sent to England before 1768, Philip Miller.

  • Adenophora lilifolia Ladybells Z 3-8

    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells

    $9.75/ea

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    Adenophora lilifolia    Ladybells   Z 3-8
    Fragrant, flared, downfacing bluebells in midsummer, July and August

    Size: 18" x 12" spreader
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: central Europe east to Siberia

    Adenophora is Greek from aden meaning “gland” and phore meaning “to bear.” Japanese cultivated this for edible root. “Fragrant blue flowers, freely borne on a loose pyramidal inflorescence.” H.H. Thomas, 1915. “Well suited for the mixed border.” William Robinson, 1899.

  • Adiantum aleuticum Western Maidenhair Fern Z 3-9

    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

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    $9.95/bareroot

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    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

    Size: 30” x 30”
    Care: shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Both east and west of the Cascade Mountains and is also found scattered along the eastern seaboard
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant
    Awards: Elisabeth C Miller Great Plant Pick, RHS Award of Garden Merit

    Natives used the stems of Maidenhair Fern in basketry designs.  They also used a tea made from the leaves as a hair wash.  The Quinault burnt the leaves and rubbed ashes in their hair to make it long, shiny and black.  California natives used the stems for pierced earrings, either alone or with feathers; inserting them into the ear lobe to keep the hole from closing.  The leaves were also chewed for internal wounds, chest pain, or stomach trouble.  Capillaire cough syrup originally made from A. capillus-veneris has also been made from A. aleuticum.

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z.4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    $8.25/3" pot

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding.