Shop

Showing 9–12 of 613 results

  • Achnatherum calamagrostis Silver spike grass Z 5-8

    graceful, tawny-silvery spikes on this clumping grass

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Achnatherum calamagrostis syn. Stipa calamagrostis  Silver spike grass  Z 5-8
    Gorgeous, graceful, tawny-silvery spikes on this clumping grass from June all summer

    Size: 36" x 36"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Central & southern Europe

    Collected before 1750

  • Acinos alpinus syn. Calamintha alpina Satureia alpina

    Reddish purple flowers all summer and fall

    $7.95/pot

    Buy

    Acinos alpinus syn. Calamintha alpina syn. Clinopodium alpina   Satureia   Alpine basil thyme, Rock thyme  Z 5-10
    Reddish purple flowers bloom on cushions all summer and fall – “long and late season of bloom.” Foster

    Size: 4-6”x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: European mountains - Alps and Pyrenees

    Collected before 1753.
    Common name for its aromatic foliage. It has been used to reduce excessive sweating and fever.  Also, leaves may be brewed for tea.

  • Aconitum fischeri Fischer’s monkshood syn. A. carmichaelii

    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Aconitum fischeri  Fischer’s monkshood  syn. A. carmichaelii   Z 2-7
    Spikes of cobalt blue hooded blooms September – October       POISON

    Size: 24-36”x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist soil
    Native: No. Japan, E. Russia, Korea, China
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies.

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus.  Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.  In China called “bao ye wo tou.”  Wm. Robinson considered this one of the best monkshoods.  Collected before 1820.

  • Aconitum napellus ‘Albus’ White Monkshood, Wolfsbane Z 4-8 POISON

    Purest of white hooded blooms flowering along spikes in mid to late summer

    Placeholder

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Purest of white hooded blooms flowering along spikes in mid to late summer

    Size: 2-3” x 18-24”
    Care: part shade, cool, moist soil
    Native: Europe

    The name Aconitum is from the mythical hill Aconitus in Pontica where Hercules fought with Cerberus. The Monkshood reputedly sprang from the jaws of Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld. Believed to make a potion that helped witches fly. This was identified by Dioscordies in De Materica Medica for medicinal use around 70 A.D. Philip Miller in The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that the name Aconitum comes from Greek word for dart “because the Barbarians used to daub their darts therewith.” He also considered “in flower it makes a pretty appearance.”Used by physicians in 1200’s and to poison wolves: “This Wolf’s bayne of all poisons is the most hastie poison.” Wm. Turner, 1560’s. Called Monkshood due to the shape of each flower like a monk’s hood.
    This white variety in English gardens before 1768, Philip Miller’s Garden Dictionary