Perennials & Biennials

Showing 25–28 of 512 results

  • Alcea rosea var. nigra Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.  

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    $9.95/bareroot

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    Alcea rosea var. nigra  Black hollyhock BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Early to late summer spikes of single jet-black/maroon platters.

     

    Size: 5-8’ x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: West Asia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Hollyhocks have been cultivated in China for thousands of years where it symbolized the passing of time. They cooked the leaves for a vegetable and also ate the buds. Transported from Middle East to Europe by the Crusaders and introduced to England by 1573. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600. Culpepper, a 17th century English herbalist, claimed the plant could be used to cure ailments of the “belly, Stone, Reins, Kidneys, Bladder, Coughs, Shortness of Breath, Wheesing, … the King’s Evil,, Kernels, Chin-cough, Wounds, Bruises, Falls. . . (and) Sun-burning.” Both single and double forms grew in England by the time of Parkinson (1629). Parkinson said they came “in many and sundry colours.” John Winthrop Jr. introduced the 1st hollyhock to the New World in the 1630’s.

    In the 1880’s Mr. W. Charter of Saffron Walden in England cultivated frilly doubles, now known as ‘Charter’s Doubles.’

  • Alchemilla alpina Alpine lady’s mantle

    short sprays of chartreuse-yellow flowers in early summer

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    $8.45/pot

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    Alchemilla alpina   Alpine lady’s mantle  Z 3-9
    From a low mound of palmate, silvery-margined leaves with silver undersides emerge short sprays of chartreuse-yellow flowers in early summer.  Will rebloom if cut back flowers after bloom

    Size: 6-8” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and southern Greenland

    Named by Linnaeus 1753. Philip Miller described this as having leaves “that are very white and deeply cut into five parts like a hand…” The Gardeners Dictionary 1783

  • Alchemilla erythropoda Dwarf lady’s mantle Z 3-7

    A miniature Lady’s Mantle for edging borders or growing in the rock garden. Short sprays of chartreuse flowers appear over a dense mound of scalloped light-green leaves that catch and hold rain or dewdrops

    $9.95/bareroot

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    A miniature Lady’s Mantle for edging borders or growing in the rock garden. Short sprays of chartreuse flowers appear over a dense mound of scalloped light-green leaves that catch and hold rain or dewdrops

    Size: 6-10” x 9-12”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Europe
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    You might not transmute gold with Alchemilla, but foamy clusters of tiny, starlike flowers in yellow-green chartreuse bloom above scalloped, tooth-edged foliage. A contrast of forms and greens Alchemilla was used to collect dewdrops in the medieval preparation of the Philosopher’s Stone. We find the way moisture collects and moves like mercury on the pale green leaves always magical.

    Described in Flora Kavkaza Flora Kavkaza in 1928.

  • Alchemilla mollis Lady’s mantle

    Petite chartreuse flowers cover foot long sprays

    $10.45/bareroot

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    Alchemilla mollis syn. A. vulgaris Lady’s mantle  Z 4-7
    Petite chartreuse flowers cover foot long sprays in early to midsummer.  Mounds of fan-like blue-grey foliage. Wonderful groundcover.

    Size: 24"x S 30"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: East Carpathians, Caucasus

    Named for alchemists, medieval chemists who believed they could transmute ordinary substances into gold. Dew drops beading on the fan shaped leaves were added to gold-making recipes. 16th century English medicinal uses included: cures for inflammation from wounds, bruises and flu, clot blood, aid conception and discourage miscarriages. Reputedly the plant also returned women to their former beauty of youth. Cultivated in U.S. since 1800’s.