Perennials & Biennials

Showing 45–48 of 529 results

  • Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ Windflower

    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’  Windflower    Z 4-8
    Pearl-like buds open to graceful single white umbels in autumn. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 4-5’x 12” and spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. 2016 Perennial Plant of Year

    The Japanese anemone introduced to cultivation in the West when Robert Fortune found them growing wild at a graveyard near Shanghai in 1844. Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ is a sport of a cross between Japanese anemone and A. vitifolia, introduced by Lady Amherst from Nepal in 1829.  This white sport appeared in the nursery of Messier Jobert at Verdun-sur-Meuse in 1851.  He propagated it and named it for his daughter, Honorine. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone PERENNIAL Z. 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    $8.25/pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

  • Anemone cylindrica Thimbleweed PERENNIAL Z 4-7

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in June. Erect cylinders persist summer and fall.

    $10.95/pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in June. Erect cylinders persist summer and fall.

    Size: 2’ x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: on the east – Maine to Delaware & west – British Columbia to Arizona. WI native

    HoChunk put masticated fuzz from the seeds on boils or carbuncles, opening them after a day. Collected from the wild before 1880’s. Plant emits allelopathogin that inhibits seed germination of other plants. Leaves, if eaten, cause mouth irritation, so that critters (rabbits & deer) leave it alone. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

  • Anemone sylvestris Snowdrop anemone/Wind flower Z 4-9

    snowy white blossoms with pineapple colored stamens

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Anemone sylvestris Snowdrop anemone, Wind flower  Z 4-9
    In late spring and early summer snowy white blossoms with pineapple colored stamens emerge from pearl shaped buds

    Size: 12-20" x 12-20" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Caucasus

    In gardens since before 1753. Grown by Jefferson at Monticello.