Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 41–48 of 146 results

  • Comptonia peregrina Sweet Fern Z 2-6 SHRUB

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

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    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Size: 2-5’ x 4’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Prefers acidic, but will grow in other types of soil as well. Drought and salt tolerant.
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies, & birds. Larval host plant for a wide variety of moths, including the Io moth & several Sphinx moth species, and the Anise Swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant. Nitrogen fixer.

    Genus name honors Henry Compton (1632-1713), Bishop of London and patron of botany.
    Peregrina means exotic or immigrant. Many Native Americans (Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa, Delaware, Menominee, Delaware, Potawatomi) used this plant for a wide variety of purposes: Crushed leaves inhaled for headache. Leaf infusions for: round worms, fevers, beverage, blood purifier, blisters, clear mucus from lungs, bladder inflammation, rash from poison ivy, swelling, flux, stomach cramps, itch.   Fragrance leaves- burned or crushed for incense in ceremony, perfume,   Decoction – childbirth, tonic,   Other: sprinkle on medicine to poison enemy, prevent blueberries from spoiling, leaves in fire to make smudge to ward off mosquitoes.
    Collected before 1753.

  • Convallaria majalis Lily of the Valley Z 2-7

    Classic - dainty alabaster white bells perfume the air

    $7.75/pot

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    Classic – dainty alabaster bells perfume the air in spring. Fragrance unmistakeable. Wonderful groundcover under trees.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 9" x Spreading.
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: north temperate zones in the world.

    Cultivated since at least 1000 B.C. The Norse goddess of dawn adopted it as her special flower. One legend claims the plant first appeared on the spot where St. Leonard shed blood while slaying the dragons. 17th century herbalists used Lily of the Valley to improve memory and strengthen the heartbeat. Grown by Jefferson.

  • Coreopsis rosea Pink tickseed Z 4-8

    pink daisies with yellow centers from summer through autumn

    $8.75/pot

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    Dainty (appearing but actually tough) pink daisies with yellow centers from summer through autumn, very long blooming. Wonderful for rock gardens,  groundcover or front of border.

    Size: 10” x 12”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil. Slow to emerge in spring so don't forget where it is.
    Native: Eastern No. America
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies

    Coreopsis is Greek meaning “buglike” referring to the seeds looking like little black bugs.  Thomas Nuttall 1st collected this flower in 1815 about 20 miles NW of Savannah along the river.  He described its native habitat: “in open grassy swamps from New Jersey to Georgia…” William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border called this “a neat and pretty plant.”  In 1913 Sanders wrote that it “make(s) a brilliant display of color (when) grown in masses in sunny borders.”

  • Coreopsis verticillata Thread leafed tickseed Z 4-9

    All summer into fall, non-stop - yolk yellow daisies

    $8.75/bareroot

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    All summer into fall, free-blooming non-stop – yolk yellow daisies atop wirey stems.

    Size: 24" x 18" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: S.E. U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Exported from its native America to England in 1759. Used to dye cloth red.

  • Delphinium tricorne Dwarf larkspur, Spring larkspur Z 4-8

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available to order in Spring only

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    Size: 18-24” – 6-9”
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: PA to IA, s. to GA, AL, AR & e. OK
    Wildlife Value: food for hummingbirds and butterflies; deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected by Andre Michaux c. 1800. Cherokee used this for heart ailments and reported that it makes cows intoxicated and they die. The name tricorne comes from the 3-cornered shape of its seeds, like the shape of colonial hats with brims turned up on three sides.

  • Dianthus carthusianorum Clusterhead Pink

    Deep reddish pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Rosy carmine pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    Size: 16" x 8"
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Deer resistant & drought tolerant
    Native: Central and southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Clusterhead pink may have come into gardens with the Carthusian monks in the 1100’s. American gardens since 1800’s.

  • Dianthus gratianopolitanus Cheddar pink

    Sun in well drained soil Z 3-8

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    Summer, deep pink, fragrant flowers atop 6″ tall mounds of slender, silvery blue foliage.

    Size: 6" x 16"
    Care: Sun, moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Northwest and central Europe

    Theophrastus named Dianthus in the 4th century B.C., meaning “Jove’s flower.”  The common name “pink” is from “pinct” referring to the jagged edge of the petals.  Name “cheddar” from the Cheddar Gorge in England. American cultivation since 1800’s. Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

  • Dicentra spectablis Alba White bleeding heart Z 3-9

    Dangling alabaster, heart shaped blossoms

    $13.25/bareroot

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    May – June classic sprays of dangling alabaster, heart shaped blossoms. One of the best.

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Part shade to shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Japan & China
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Dicentra derived from Greek dis meaning “two” and kentros meaning “spurs” because the flowers have two spurs. Spectabilis means “worthy of notice.” This white form was available by 1877.