Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 25–32 of 165 results

  • Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon Z 5-8

    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring, repeats in fall. Fuzzy, silver-grey foliage

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    Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ syn. A. glutinosum Perennial snapdragon, Spanish snapdragon  Z 5-8
    Rose pink, with yellow above the lower lip, snapdragon-shaped blooms in spring and repeats in fall. Fuzzy, glaucous, silver-grey foliage. Excellent for places you want low-growing, drought tolerant flowers.

    Size: 12” x 2’
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain & Morocco
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, attracts hummingbirds

    Described in 1852 in Pugillus Plantarum Novarum Africae Borealis Hispaniaeque Australis

  • Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    May - June scarlet and yellow columbines

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    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.

  • Aquilegia flabellata v. pumila syn. Aquilegia flabellata ‘Nana’, Aquilegia fauriei Dwarf Fan columbine Z 4-9

    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    $10.95/bareroot

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    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    Size: 6-9” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil, Deadhead for rebloom
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: deer and rabbit resistant. Attracts butterflies

    Latin word flabellatus mean fanlike referring to leaflet shape. First published as Aquilegia buergeriana var. pumila in Swiss journal Bulletin de l’Herbier Boissier 5: 1090. 1897.

  • Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip Z 4-9

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Arisaema triphyllum syn. Arisaema atrorubens  Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip    Z 4-9
    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall – a favorite shade plant

    Size: 6-24”x 12”
    Care: Part shade - shade in moist soil
    Native: Eastern No. America, Wisconsin native.

    Pawnee medicine men pulverized the corm to treat headaches and rheumatism.  The Cherokee used it to cure headaches, the common cold, ringworm, boils and “for scald head (and) scrofulous sores.”  Iroquois remedied adolescent diarrhea and listless infants with Jack-in-the-pulpit.  Also “for nonconception caused by cold blood” and for “temporary sterility.”  Chopped root mixed with whiskey cured colds.  It induced pregnancy for female horses.   Menominee pulverized the root, placed in incised lip to counteract witchery on the face.  The seed predicted death or recovery for the Meskwaki who also used it as poison to kill enemies.  The Potawatomi discovered that cooking the root for 3 days eliminated the poison.   HoChunk spread a compound of the root on neuralgia or rheumatism. Native Americans boiled the berries and roasted the root, for food. Garden cultivation since 1664.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Aronia arbutifolia Red chokeberry syn. Photinia pyrifolia SHRUB Z 5-9

    Corymbs of white in spring, gorgeous red foliage in fall compliments the red berries that persist into winter

    $16.95/bareroot

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Corymbs of white in spring, gorgeous red foliage in fall compliments the red berries that persist into winter

    Size: 6-10' X 3-6' spreading to form colonies
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to well-drained acidic soil. Prune annually in late winter to promote vigorous growth. Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia west to Ontario south to TX & FL
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, butterflies, and pollinators

    Showy shrub collected by André Michaux around 1800.  Aronia  comes from aria a subgenus of a related plant, Sorbus.  Arbutifolia means “leaves like the Arbutus.”  William Robinson, father of mixed borders, reported:  “Massed, charming both in flower and fine color of leaf in autumn.”

    Native Americans used to treat the common cold

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Artemisia frigida Prairie sagewort, Silky wormwood, Z 3-10

    Erect stems bear silvery-white, finely-divided foliage. Leaves smell like camphor. Small yellow flowers bloom in summer. 

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    $11.95/bareroot

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    Erect stems bear silvery-white, finely-divided foliage. Leaves smell like camphor. Small yellow flowers bloom in summer. 

    Size: 6-18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: all North America except the SE, CA and OR, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, source of nesting material for native bees, food for caterpillars of several butterflies & moths
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit
    Size: Native Americans used this Artemisia to preserve meat, feed horses, repel insects, to remedy toothache, headache, coughing, lung ailments, heartburn, and colds. Indians in Great Basin used it in ceremonies .Chippewa made a decoction of root for convulsions.

    Meriwether Lewis collected this in early September 1804  along the Missouri River in South Dakota on October 3 1804.

  • Artemisia lactiflora White mugwort Z 3-8

    Blooms in plumes of creamy white, resembling an astilbe, above blackish green leaves with silver undersides, August to October

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    Blooms in plumes of creamy white, resembling an astilbe, above blackish green leaves with silver undersides, August to October

    Size: 4-5’ x 1.5-2’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: East asia-China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & bees. Rabbit and Deer tolerant
    Awards: Recipient of the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Genus is named for Artemis, Greek goddess of the moon, wild animals, and hunting. Lactiflora means “milk-white flowers”

    The leaves and flowering stems were used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat menstrual & liver disorders, and anti-inflammatory medicines. In East and Southeast Asia the leaves and tender stems are eaten boiled or stir fried, or in soups.

  • Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7

    brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover's lacquered, round leaves

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger    Z 3-7
    Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves.

    Size: 6" x 6" spreading
    Care: part shade to shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to North Carolina, Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used Wild ginger for such diverse purposes as flavoring food, cure heart palpitations, induce menstrual cycles, cure “the bite of the serpent,” mend broken bones and lure catfish. Colonists used the plant to break fever and stimulate the appetite.