Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 17–24 of 153 results

  • Anemone cylindrica Thimbleweed Z 4-7

    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    $11.95/pot

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    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    Size: 2’ x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Maine to Delaware, British Columbia to Arizona and all parts in between. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Leaves causing mouth irritation deters rabbit and deer. Pollinated by bees and flies.

    HoChunk and Winnebago put masticated fuzz from the seeds on boils or carbuncles, opening them after a day.   Sioux used the rot, a tap root, to treat burns, headaches and headaches.  Collected for botany from the wild before 1880’s.  Plant emits allelopathogin inhibiting seed germination of other plants.

  • Anemone sylvestris Snowdrop anemone/Wind flower Z 4-9

    Spring and sporadically in fall - pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Spring and sporadically in fall – pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    Size: 12-20" x 12-20" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Caucasus, “grows naturally in many parts of Germany… ”Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768

    In 1629 Parkinson extolled the Anemone: “The sight of them doth enforce an earnest longing in the mind of anyone to be a possessour of some of them…”  The leaves of the plant were used in ointment made into “cold grieses” was used to “warm and comfort the parts (and) the roote… is apt to drawe downe rheume if it be tasted or chewed.”  Paradisi in Sole Paradisus Terrestris.  The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.” The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.  In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, uses these flowers to herald his coming in early spring.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello.

  • Anemone vitifolia ‘Robustissima’ Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and fall

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and early fall.

    Size: 30"x 36" spreader
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: early cultivated variety of A. vitifolia native to Nepal.

    The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.”  The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, used another species of Anemone to herald his coming in early spring. A. vitifolia first introduced from its native Nepal to European garden cultivation by Lady Amhurst in 1829.

  • Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    May - June scarlet and yellow columbines

    $12.25/bareroot

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    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.

  • Aquilegia flabellata v. pumila syn. Aquilegia flabellata ‘Nana’, Aquilegia fauriei Dwarf Fan columbine Z 4-9

    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    $9.95/bareroot

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    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    Size: 6-9” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil, Deadhead for rebloom
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: deer and rabbit resistant. Attracts butterflies

    Latin word flabellatus mean fanlike referring to leaflet shape. First published as Aquilegia buergeriana var. pumila in Swiss journal Bulletin de l’Herbier Boissier 5: 1090. 1897.

  • Arisaema dracontium syn. Arum dracontium   Green dragon, Dragon root  Z 4-9   POISON 

    A greenish, long-tipped spadix (the "dragon’s tongue") grows several inches beyond a narrow green spathe, a narrow, greenish, hooded, cylinder. Numerous tiny flowers crowd onto the 6-inch-long flower stem.  Tiny white flowers in spring turn into a spike of red berries in fall.

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    A greenish, long-tipped spadix (the “dragon’s tongue”) grows several inches beyond a narrow green spathe, a narrow, greenish, hooded, cylinder. Numerous tiny flowers crowd onto the 6-inch-long flower stem.  Tiny white flowers in spring turn into a spike of red berries in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 6-8”
    Care: part-shade to shade in moist, slightly acidic soil
    Native: NH to Florida, west to TX, north to MN. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant. Although poison to humans, birds, wild turkeys and wood thrush as well as some mammals eat the berries.

    Named by 1753. Arisaema, is Greek for “blood arum” or “red arum”. Dracontium, means “of the dragon” in Latin. Named for the resemblance of the spadix to the tongue of a dragon.  For the Menominee sacred bundles of the roots and gave the owner the power of supernatural dreams.

  • Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip Z 4-9

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall

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    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall – a favorite shade plant

    Size: 6-24”x 12”
    Care: Part shade - shade in moist soil
    Native: Eastern No. America, Wisconsin native.

    Pawnee medicine men pulverized the corm to treat headaches and rheumatism.  The Cherokee used it to cure headaches, the common cold, ringworm, boils and “for scald head (and) scrofulous sores.”  Iroquois remedied adolescent diarrhea and listless infants with Jack-in-the-pulpit.  Also “for nonconception caused by cold blood” and for “temporary sterility.”  Chopped root mixed with whiskey cured colds.  It induced pregnancy for female horses.   Menominee pulverized the root, placed in incised lip to counteract witchery on the face.  The seed predicted death or recovery for the Meskwaki who also used it as poison to kill enemies.  The Potawatomi discovered that cooking the root for 3 days eliminated the poison.   HoChunk spread a compound of the root on neuralgia or rheumatism. Native Americans boiled the berries and roasted the root, for food. Garden cultivation since 1664.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Aronia arbutifolia Red chokeberry syn. Photinia pyrifolia SHRUB Z 5-9

    Corymbs of white in spring, gorgeous red foliage in fall compliments the red berries that persist into winter

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Corymbs of white in spring, gorgeous red foliage in fall compliments the red berries that persist into winter

    Size: 6-10' X 3-6' spreading to form colonies
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to well-drained acidic soil. Prune annually in late winter to promote vigorous growth. Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia west to Ontario south to TX & FL
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, butterflies, and pollinators

    Showy shrub collected by André Michaux around 1800.  Aronia  comes from aria a subgenus of a related plant, Sorbus.  Arbutifolia means “leaves like the Arbutus.”  William Robinson, father of mixed borders, reported:  “Massed, charming both in flower and fine color of leaf in autumn.”

    Native Americans used to treat the common cold

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.