Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 9–12 of 148 results

  • Adiantum aleuticum Western Maidenhair Fern Z 3-9

    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

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    $10.45/bareroot

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    Bright green fronds perch atop black stems like the fingers of an open hand

    Size: 30” x 30”
    Care: shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: East and west of the Cascade Mountains and is also found scattered along the eastern seaboard
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant
    Awards: Elisabeth C Miller Great Plant Pick, Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    According to folklore if a girl can hold the stem without causing the leaves to tremble, then she was chaste.
    Natives used the stems in basketry designs and made tea from the leaves to use as a hair wash.  Quinault burnt the leaves and rubbed ashes in their hair to make it long, shiny and black.  California Natives used the stems for pierced earrings, inserting them into the ear lobe to keep the hole from closing. They chewed the leaves to remedy internal wounds, chest pain, or stomach trouble and made a cough syrup from it.

  • Aethionema grandiflorum Persian stonecress Z 5-8

    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

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    $8.25/pot

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    Bushy, low growing perennial with blue-green leaves and spikes of fragrant pink to lavender flowers, June-July

    Size: 6-12” x 12-18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Iran, Iraq, Caucasus, Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts honeybees & other pollinators, Deer & Rabbit resistant.
    Awards: Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society

    Short-lived perennial, but self-seeds where happy. Described in 1849 by Pierre Edmond Boissier and Rudolph Friedrich Hohenacker.

  • Agastache aurantiaca Navajo sunset Z 5-9

    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

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    Agastache aurantiaca   Navajo sunset   Z 5-9
    Brilliant light orange blooms from spring-fall, silvery-grey aromatic foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western US
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant

    Published in American Midland Naturalist 1945.

  • Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop

    Showy blue spikes from July to September, fragrant

    $10.45/bareroot

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    Agastache foeniculum  Anise hyssop Z 4-8
    Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant

    Size: 3-5' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning much like an ear of wheat referring to the shape of the flower spike. Anise hyssop leaves were used by American Indians of the Missouri River region to make tea and as a sweetener in cooking. The Cheyenne used it to relieve chest pain due to coughing or to a dispirited heart. Listed hyssop as an aromatic herb in McMahon’s 1805 book.