Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 41–48 of 117 results

  • Cortusa matthiola Alpine bells Z 4-9

    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Demure purple, drooping bells atop a short scape arising from a low carpet of foliage in May-June.

    Size: 9” x 10”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Alps

    Discovered in a valley near Vincenza Italy in the foothills of the eastern Alps by Padua botany professor J.A. Cortusus. His friend Mattioli (1500-1577) named it for him and the species was named for Mattioli.  According to Mattioli women used the leaves to color their cheeks pink: “the leaves applied to the cheeks, and shortly removed, occasion a beautiful colour, resembling that from the finest rouge. . .” Gerard grew this in London in the 1590’s but it was “at all times rare.”    Profiled in 1807 in Curtis’ Botanical Magazine, plate 987

  • Corydalis lutea syn. Pseudofumaria lutea Z 4-8

    Yellow blooms from late spring - fall

    $8.25/pot

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    Yellow trumpet-like clusters from late spring – fall. One of the few shade perennials that blooms non-stop.

    Size: 9-15" x 18"
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Throughout Europe

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower, a lark’s spur. Lutea means “yellow.” According to 16th century herbalist Culpepper, “Saturn owns the herb” so Corydalis lutea cured Saturn’s diseases of the liver, spleen, leprosy, scabs, itches, cholera, salty blood, jaundice, melancholy, plague, pestilence and red eyes.  The Greek Dioscordes claimed that it “hinders fresh springing of hairs on the eye lids.” Since 1800’s in U.S.

  • Corydalis ochroleuca syn. Pseudofumaria alba Z 4-8

    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow

    $8.25/pot

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    Creamy white flowers touched with yellow from May to October.  One of longest blooming flowers for shade.

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans

    Corydalis is Greek for “lark” korydalos, referring to the shape of flower resembling a lark’s spur. Garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931) planted Corydalis ochroleuca as a “wide carpet” under peonies in her spring garden at her home, Munstead Wood.

  • Dendranthema weyrichii syn. Chrysanthemum weyrichii Alpine daisy Z 4-8

    Pink or white daisies all summer and fall

    $8.25/pot

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    Pink or white daisies all summer and fall. One of the best for groundcover, front of border or rock garden plant.

    Size: 6” x 18”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: East Asia & eastern Russia

    Collected before 1891

  • Dianthus anatolicus Anatolian pink Z 5-10

    Dense mound-forming perennial with needle-like, evergreen grey foliage. Masses of whitish pink, feather- margined flowers with a wine-colored eye bloom in May-June. Highly regarded alpine plant.

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    $8.25/pot

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    Dense mound-forming perennial with needle-like, evergreen grey foliage. Masses of whitish pink, feather- margined flowers with a wine-colored eye bloom in May-June. Highly regarded alpine plant.

    Size: 3” x 6”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey to Tibet

    Theophrastus named Dianthus in the 4th century B.C., meaning “Jove’s flower.” The common name “pink” is from “pinct” referring to the jagged edge of the petals.   In 1629 John Parkinson described the Dianthus: “There remain divers sorts of wild or small Gilloflowers (which wee usually call Pinkes) to be entreated of, some bearing single, and some double flowers, some smooth, almost without any deepe dents on the edges, and some ragged, or as it were feathered.” This species described in Diagnoses Plantarum Orientalium Novarum, ser. 1 1: 22. 1843.

  • Dianthus arpadianus

    Small pale pink flowers sit above short clumps of evergreen foliage  

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Small pale pink flowers sit above short clumps of evergreen foliage

    Size: 3” x 3”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Greece & Turkey

    Collected before 1934

  • Dianthus carthusianorum Clusterhead Pink

    Deep reddish pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Rosy carmine pink flowers atop wiry stems from June until frost

    Size: 16" x 8"
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Deer resistant & drought tolerant
    Native: Central and southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attract hummingbirds

    Clusterhead pink may have come into gardens with the Carthusian monks in the 1100’s. American gardens since 1800’s.

  • Dianthus deltoides Maiden pink Z 3-9

    Petite jagged-edged petals in early summer

    $8.25/pot

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    Petite, jagged-edged petals bloom May-June & longer if deadhead   bright pink or white

    Size: 8”x 12”
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil
    Native: Scotland to Norway

    Theophrastus named Dianthus in the 4th century B.C., meaning “Jove’s flower.”  The common name “pink” is from “pinct” referring to the jagged edge of the petals. Deltoides refers to the inverted V-shaped pocket at the base of the petals.  In 1629 John Parkinson described the Dianthus:”There remain divers sorts of wild or small Gilloflowers (which wee usually call Pinkes) to be entreated of, some bearing single, and some double flowers, some smooth, almost without any deepe dents on the edges, and some ragged, or as it were feathered.  Some growing upright like unto Gilloflowers, others creeping… some of one colour, some of another, and many of divers colours.”  D. deltoides 1st identified in 1671 by Pinax.