Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 25–32 of 92 results

  • Campanula portenschlagiana Dalmatian bellflower Z 4-8

    Purple, upfacing bells for months in mid to late summer

    $8.75/pot

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    Purple, upfacing bells for months in mid to late summer

    Size: 4-6” x 20”
    Care: full sun-part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Yugoslavia
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. Top rated for ornamental traits and landscape performance by the Chicago Botanic Garden & Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick.

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.”  In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers.” This species named for one of its discoverers, Franz Edler von Portenschlag-Ledermayer (1772-1822). 1st described inSystema Vegetabilium 5: 93 in 1819.  Listed in Sanders’ Flower Garden in 1913.

  • Campanula poscharskyana Adriatic bellflower Z 3-8

    Lilac colored star-shaped blooms from summer through fall

    $8.75/pot

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    Lilac colored star-shaped blooms from summer through fall. Grow in the front of the garden, as a groundcover or in rock gardens.

    Size: 6" X 24"
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Tolerant of Walnut toxicity.
    Native: Mountains of Eastern Europe
    Awards: Top rated by the Chicago Botanic Garden. Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” In 1629 Parkinson described campanulas as “cherished for the beautie of their flowers.” Collected before 1822. Named for 19th century German plantsman, Gustav Poscharsky.

  • Campanula rotundifolia Harebell, Bluebell of Scotland Z 3-8

    Dainty bluish-lilac bells blooms June - October

    $8.75/pot

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    This Bluebell’s delicate appearance conceals its hardy constitution. Dainty bluish-lilac bells top 12″ stems on bushy plants blooming from June through October. Perfect for rock gardens and borders.

    Size: 9-12" x S 12"
    Care: Sun to part shade moist well-drained soil, tolerant Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe, Siberia and North America, Wisconsin native

    No wonder Sir Walter Scott immortalized the Bluebell of Scotland in Lady of the Lake. Also a subject in Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

  • Cerastium biebersteinii Mouse ear Z 4-7

    White felt-like foliage, covered with white flowers

    $8.75/pot

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    White felt-like foliage, covered with white flowers in spring.  Makes a wonderful groundcover.

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Tauria

    Cerastium is from the Greek keras meaning horn because of the shape of the seed capsule. Six inch tall, spreading, small chalky-velvet leaves. Rarely offered but should be. Used as a groundcover for its frosted, felt-like foliage under tropical plants in Victorian gardens. American gardens since 1860.

  • Chaenorhinum glareosum Dwarf snapdragon Z 5-9

    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

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    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    Size: 4” x 9-12” semi-trailing cushion
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

    1st described in 1838. Chaenorhinum means “honey lotus” in Greek.

  • Chiastophyllum oppositifolium  Syn. Umbilicus oppositifolius Lamb’s tail  Z 5-9

    Rare Sedum relative for shady gardens forming a low mound of thick, succulent green leaves, bearing arching, upright stems with dangling chains of bright yellow flowers in May-June. Ideal for edging in the shade border, in rock walls, or between flagstones. Adapts well to growing in tubs or mixed containers.

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    $8.95/pot

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    Rare Sedum relative for shady gardens forming a low mound of thick, succulent green leaves, bearing arching, upright stems with dangling chains of bright yellow flowers in May-June. Ideal for edging in the shade border, in rock walls, or between flagstones. Adapts well to growing in tubs or mixed containers.

    Size: 6-8” x 10-12”
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus Mountains
    Awards: Recipient Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    1st described and named as Cotyledon oppostitfoilum in Bulletin scientifique (publié par l’) Académie Imperiale des Sciences de Saint-Pétersbourg 2: 813. 1837.

  • Chrysanthemum alpinum syn. Luecanthemopsis alpina Alpine daisy Z 5-

    Short white daisies blooming June-August atop basal foliage, spreads to form small mat.

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    Short white daisies blooming June-August atop basal foliage, spreads to form small mat.

    Size: 4” x spreading
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of Europe

    1st described by French botanist Tournefort, early 1700’s. Wm. Robinson (1883): “A very dwarf plant. The leaves are small, and the abundant flowers are supported on hoary little stems 1 to 3 inches long, are pure white with yellow centres, and are more than 1” across… well deserves cultivation in bare level places, on poor sandy or gravely soil in the rock garden.”

  • Clematis fremontii Fremont’s leatherflower Z 4-7

    Purple to white nodding bells with petal tips flipped up

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    Purple to white nodding bells with petal tips flipped up on this short perennial – not a vine

    Size: 12" x 12"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Missouri, Kansas & Nebraska

    1st collected by John C. Fremont (1813-1890) celebrated American explorer, participant in the “Bear Revolt” that made California independent from Mexico & in turn part of the United States, Governor of California, 1st Senator of California, owner of a California gold mine, abolitionist, 1st candidate for US president on the Republican ticket and Civil War general fired by Lincoln for freeing the slaves of Missouri.  After accumulating fabulous wealth and spending it all, he died in poverty in New York.