Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 13–16 of 104 results

  • Anchusa capensis Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss

    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall

    $5.25/pot

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    Anchusa capensis  Cape forget-me-not, Cape bugloss  Z 6-9 self-seeding annual in colder areas
    Truest of blue flowers from summer through fall.  Do you need to know anything else?

    Size: 8” x 8”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: So. Africa.
    Awards: Plant Select® Central Rocky Mountain region

    Collected and introduced to Europe in 1794 by von Thunberg (1743-1828). Carl Peter von Thunberg, student of Linnaeus at Uppsala University in Sweden, made three trips to the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775 where he collected about 1000 new species, Java and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) 1777 and 15 months in Japan where he befriended local doctors who gave him hundreds of plants new to Western horticulture.  He succeeded Linnaeus as professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala and King Gustav beknighted him.   Young Cape forget-me-not plants were eaten as a vegetable, Annals of the South African Museum, 1898.  Louise Beebe Wilder loved this plant, effusing, “One of the prettiest (blue annuals) is the Cape Forget-me-not.  Not one of its cerulean family boasts a purer blue and its summer-long period of bloom and indifference to drought make it a really valuable annual.  It has also a sturdy habit of growth and sowing its hardy seeds freely it does its best to become a permanent resident.”  Robinson called it “Remarkably fine…” The Garden 1873.  The name Anchusa from anchousa paint used on skin.

  • Anemonella thalictroides Rue anemone, Windflower Z 4-7

    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    $7.95/pot

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    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: N.H through Ontario to Minn. Including WI, south to Florida & Kansas

    First described by Linnaeus – 1753. Philip Miller grew this in 1768. Named Anemonella because the flowers resemble those of the Amenome and thalictroides because the leaves resemble the leaves of the Thalictrum, Meadowrue. Native Americans ate the tuberous root for food and made a tea from Rue anemone by steeping the root in water. The tea supposedly cured flu-like symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting.

  • Antennaria dioica Pussy toes Z 5-9

    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot

    $6.95/pot

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    Antennaria dioica   Pussy toes   Z 5-9
    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot, flowers in early summer, great silvery-gray foliage, good groundcover and rock garden plant.

    Size: 2” x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Temperate areas worldwide

    Antennaria from the Latin antenna originally referring to the mast of a sailboat.  Part of the flower supposedly resembles a butterfly’s antennae.  Historically used for medicine as an astringent, a cough remedy and to break fever.  First described by German physician and botanical author Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566).  Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931), mother of the mixed perennial border, planted this in her own rock garden at Munstead Wood and in the Sundial Garden at Pednor House in Buckinghamshire. The pink version, A. dioica rosea, collected in the Rocky Mountains by C.C. Parry before 1860.

  • Anthyllis vulneraria v. coccinea Red Kidney vetch, Woundwart Z 5-9

    Foliage - low mound of downy silvery-green leaves, topped by ball-shaped red flowers May to July – showy, long-blooming makes wonderful groundcover or rock garden plant

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    Anthyllis vulneraria v. coccinea Red Kidney vetch, Woundwart Z 5-9
    Foliage – low mound of downy silvery-green leaves, topped by ball-shaped red flowers May to July – showy, long-blooming

    Size: 4-6” x 12-18”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: sole food plant for small blue butterfly caterpillars. Flowers provide nectar and pollen for beetles and bees.
    Size: Showy, long-blooming makes wonderful groundcover or rock garden plant

    In traditional medicine used externally to promote wound healing and internally as a laxative and for kidney disorders. Species is ancient written about by Greek Dioscordes. Red variety since at least 1753.