Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 81–88 of 92 results

  • Silene schafta Schaft’s catchfly, Moss Z 5-7

    spectacular late season blooms – bright magenta flowers September to October

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    One of the spectacular late season blooms – bright magenta flowers September to October

    Size: 6” x Slowly spreading
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Russia

    Perfect for dry borders or rock gardens.
    Introduced from its native Russia in 1844.  In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, described the flowers of this species as being “very neat tufts.”

  • Sisyrinchium angustifolium Blue eyed grass Z 3-9

    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    Size: 10" x 6"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: North America

    American garden cultivation since 1800’s.  Described by Nuttall in 1818, The Genera of North American Plants

  • Synthyris missourica Mountain Kittentails Z 5-9

    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

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    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

    Size: 5-12” x 12” spreading into clumps by rhizomes.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains of northeast CA, Washington, Idaho & west to Montana

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on June 26, 1806 in today’s Idaho near the headwaters of what they named Hungry Creek. Common name kittentails imaginatively named for the flower stalk and its protruding stamens resembling, if you squint real hard and maybe after taking a swig of whiskey,  fuzzy, blue kitten tails.

  • Talinum calycinum syn. Phemeranthus calycanthus Rock rose, Fameflower Z 6-9

    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

    $4.25/2" pot

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    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

    Size: 8-12” x 4”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: western Plains states

    Collected by Dr. Frederick Wislizenus, German immigrant and medical partner of George Engelmann, on an exploring trip of Texas, New Mexico and Mexico in 1846.

  • Thymus pseudolanuginosus Woolly thyme Z 4-8

    miniature, very hairy silver leaves, resembling wool. Lavender flowers in June.

    $8.75/pot

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    Grown as a groundcover or in rock gardens for its miniature, very hairy silver leaves, resembling wool.  Lavender flowers in June.

    Size: 1” x 12” spreading slowly
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant. Deer resistant
    Native: Europe

    1st mentioned in literature by Phillip Miller of Chelsea Physic Garden, 1771.

  • Thymus serpyllum ‘Minus’ syn. T. praecox ‘Minus’ Dwarf thyme Z 5-9

    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers

    $4.95/pot

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    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers in midsummer, spreads to form a tight carpet.

    Size: 1” x 12” spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Size: Great for rock gardens, groundcover, drought tolerant.

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.  ‘Minus’ described by Parkinson in 1640.  He called it Thymus serphyllum vulgare minus.

  • Thymus serpyllum syn. Thymus praecox Mother-of-thyme, creeping thyme Z 4-9

    Short purple spikes in June-July

    $7.75/pot

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    Short purple spikes in June-July

    Size: 3” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe & Western Asia
    Size: groundcover, rock garden, herb, fragrant foliage, thyme lawn

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance.  Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.   This species since at least 1753. Acc’d to Parkinson in 1640 this remedied hysterics in women.  Wm. Robinson wrote,”nothing can be more charming than a sunny bank covered with” Thymus serpyllum.  LH Bailey extolled it as “prized as an evergreen edging and as cover for rockwork and waste places …The leaves are sometimes used for seasoning.”

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

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    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.