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Showing 105–112 of 122 results

  • Stipa tirsa Horsetail feather grass Z 5-8

    Thinnest of thin, white-silver panicles from thin green leaves June-July

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    Thinnest of thin, white-silver panicles from thin green leaves June-July

    Size: 18-24” x 14-20”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe, Siberia, Russia and Caucasus

    1st described in Bulletin de la Société Impériale des Naturalistes de Moscou 30(2): 115. 1857.

  • Syringa vulgaris Lilac, French lilac Z 4-8 SHRUB/SMALL TREE

    Single or double, very fragrant lilac panicles in late spring

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    Single or double, very fragrant lilac panicles in late spring
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

     

    Size: 20’ x 15’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe, Caucasus to Afghanistan

    Introduced to European from its native Turkey by Viennese ambassador De Busbecq (1522-1592).  Grown  in Jefferson’s garden at Monticello and Washington’s Mount Vernon.  By 1850 “found in almost every (American) garden.”  Breck (1851)  ‘Alba’ listed in Tradescant the Elder’s 1634 list as “Lilac Matthioli.” Elias Ashmole’s manuscript, “trees found in Mrs. Tradescants ground when it came into my possession (1662) as ‘Syringa alba.’ ”  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Thalictrum ichangense Dwarf meadowrue, Chinese meadowrue, in China called “dun ye tang song cao” Z 5-7

    Airy sprays of palest of pink flowers in early summer & sporadically reblooming

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    Airy sprays of palest of pink flowers in early summer & sporadically reblooming. Pretty foliage – flushed with purple and marbled grey, think Begonia leaves.

    Size: 6” x 6”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: forests and damp rocky ledges in Western China

    Described in literature 1888. Collected for the West by Augustine Henry (1857-1930)  Irishman who went to China as a physician in the Imperial Maritime Customs Service and stayed 20 years hunting the plants of central China. He collected about 5000 new plants.  Used in traditional Chinese medicine.
    The species name ichangense comes from the province of Ichang where Dr. Henry found this.

  • Thermopsis caroliniana syn. Thermopsis villosa Carolina lupine Z 4-9

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

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    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover-like foliage.

    Size: 4’ x 2’ spreading by root
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Drought & Heat tolerant.
    Native: forest openings in the Appalachians
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1843

  • Thermopsis lanceolata Lanceleaf thermopsis, Siberian lupin Z 3-8

    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

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    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: E. Asia, Siberia to Japan & Alaska

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;” lanceolata refers to the lance shaped leaves. Collected before 1753.

  • Thermopsis montana syn. T. rhombifolia Golden banner, False lupin Z 4-9

    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

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    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

    Size: 24-36” x 18-24” & spreading by rhizomes
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;”because the flower looks like a yellow lupine. Collected in 1834 by plant hunter extraordinaire Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) on the trip to California, the Wyeth Expedition.

  • Thymus serpyllum ssp. arcticus syn. T. praecox Lemon thyme Z 2-9

    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

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    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 4” x 12” and spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Greenland, Norway, Iceland, the Arctic, much of the US incl WI.

    Thymus from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme. This species collected on an exhibition in the Arctic before 1855. Parkinson describes lemon thyme in 1640 but it may be different than this.

  • Trillium luteum Yellow Trillium Ephemeral Z 4-8

    Sometimes mottled, hosta-like leaves support a lemon-scented, three-petaled yellow blossom in April-May

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    Sometimes mottled, hosta-like leaves support a lemon-scented, three-petaled yellow blossom in April-May

    Size: 15” x 8”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Southeastern US
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Great Plant Pick, recipient of the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    First published description by Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815) American botanist Lutheran minister and college president.