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Showing 97–104 of 125 results

  • Salix discolor Pussy willow Z 4-8

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

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    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Size: 15-20’ x 12-15’
    Care: full sun, prefers moist soil but tolerates well-drained soil
    Native: E. No. America incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Important food source for many pollinator bees incl. honey bees. Pussy willows attract queens looking for a location for a new colony. Host to caterpillars of cecropia moth and red-spotted purple, tiger swallowtail & viceroy butterflies.

    The name Salix is from “salio” meaning “to leap or dance, because of its quick growth.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768. This species introduced to cultivation by German plant hunter Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg in late 1700’s-early 1800’s. Willows contain salicin, the pain-killer in aspirin, and used since ancient Greece to relieve pain.

  • Sanguisorba tenuifolia Great burnet, Japanese burnet Z 4-8

    One to two inch long spikes - purplish red, in late summer

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    One to two inch long spikes – purplish red, in late summer

    Size: 4-6’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Asia

    Sanguisorba is Latin meaning to soak up blood, for the plant’s reputed ability to clot blood.

    Collected by 1851.

  • Schizophragma hydrangeoides ‘Rosea’ Pink Japanese hydrangea vine Z 5-8

    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

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    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

    Size: 20-30’ x 6-9’
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan where they “climb the trunks of tall trees and blossom among the lower limbs.” Arnold Arboretum Bulletin 1933.
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    ‘Rosea’ found by English planthunter Charles Maries c. 1878, collecting for London’s Veitch Nursery and referred to in The Book of Climbing Plants and Wall Shrubs, Samuel Arnett 1902.

  • Scutellaria alpina Alpine skullcap Z 5-9

    Mounds of two-toned snapdragon-like flowers July - October.

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    Bailey (1913): “A hardy spreading perennial about 10 in. high, with ovate, serrately dentate leaves and large, purple and white, somewhat yellowish flowers in dense, terminal racemes. … A handsome rock or low border perennial.” Mounds of two-toned snapdragon-like flowers July – October.

    Size: 6-10” x 12”
    Care: Sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pyrenees, Appennines to the Balkans; central Russia to southern Siberia

    Linnaeus’ imaginative mind named this genus after the Latin sculellum meaning “a little dish,” because of its resemblance to the flower’s helmet-shaped calyx. In gardens before 1753.

  • Sedum album White stonecrop Z 4-8

    Rounded leaflets green turning red in fall and winter; dainty white flowers

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    Rounded leaflets green turning red in fall and winter; dainty white flowers in mid-summer.  Perfect for rock gardens, front of border, fairy gardens, roof gardens, troughs and groundcover or any place with drought.

    Size: 4” x 12” spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil - thrives on neglect. Deer resistant & drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe, west & north Asia

    Sedum means “plant that sits.”  “Live forever” is an ancient Greek name for sedums. The Roman Pliny claimed that sedum’s juice treated wounds.  In the 1500’s English herbalist Gerard called sedums “very full of life,” referring to succulent’s quality of being very easy to grow.  This species collected before 1671. It “grows naturally upon old walls in many parts of England.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.  In 1867 described as “growing, ever so luxuriantly upon roofs and walls (as well as) the rocks at Great Malvern…” Botany of Worcestershire. Landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing recommended this for edging, 1868.

  • Sedum spurium ‘Coccineum’ Dragon’s blood Z 4-9

    Star-shaped crimson flowers August – September atop succulent red-tinged leaves that blaze all crimson in fall and winter.

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    Star-shaped crimson flowers August – September atop succulent red-tinged leaves that blaze all crimson in fall and winter. Perfect for rock gardens, front of border, fairy gardens, roof gardens, troughs and groundcover or any place with drought.

    Size: 6” x 24”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus Mountains

    Sedum means “plant that sits.” “Live forever” is an ancient Greek name for sedums. The Roman Pliny claimed that sedum’s juice treated wounds. In the 1500’s English herbalist Gerard called sedums “very full of life,” referring to succulent’s quality of being very easy to grow. Spurium means “false.” This cultivar collected before 1826.

  • Sesleria nitida Nest Moor grass Z 5-8

    Spike-like panicles of white turn purple atop mounds of gray-blue blades

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    In early spring, about the time Robins appear, spike-like panicles of white turn purple atop mounds of gray-blue blades

    Size: 24”x16”
    Care: sun to part shade in most any soil
    Native: central and southern Italy

    Collected before 1861.

  • Silene suecica syn. Lychnis alpina Arctic campion Z 4-8

    Rosy racemes May- June emerge from a mound of grass-like leaves

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    Rosy racemes May- June emerge from a mound of grass-like leaves.  Short-lived but reseeds.

    Size: 5” x 6”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Asia & Europe

    In gardens before 1753.  May 6, 1876 The Garden described its flowers as “forming bright rosy patches…”