Archives

Showing 89–96 of 122 results

  • Primula vulgaris syn. Primula acaulis English primrose Z 4-8

    Primrose yellow blossoms in earliest of spring.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Primrose yellow blossoms cheer on the earliest of spring.

    Size: 6" x 6"
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Immune to Walnut toxicity
    Native: Europe

    Primula is from Italian primavera meaning first spring. Vulgaris means common.  In gardens since 1700’s.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello. Old medicinal uses to cure gout and headaches.

  • Pulsatilla patens syn. Anemone patens Eastern pasque flower Z 3-7

    Very hard to find, native Pasque flower.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.CK

    Up-facing blue-violet bells in early spring emerge from foliage decorated with silky hairs.

    Size: 8-12” -12"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: northern Great Plains including WI, Siberia, Alaska

    The name Pasque is Old French for Easter referring to the spring bloom time. Patens means “spreading.”  South Dakota honors this as its state flower.
    Collected for gardens prior to 1753.  The Blackfoot made a decoction of this plant to speed a baby’s delivery and applied crushed leaves to skin to remedy irritation.  Omaha applied fresh, crushed leaves as a poltice for rheumatism.

  • Punica granatum var. nana Dwarf pomegranate Z 7-11

    Adorable dwarf shrub bearing orange-red blooms in July and August then tiny, edible pomegranates. Where not hardy makes good container plant and bonsai.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Adorable dwarf shrub bearing orange-red blooms in July and August then tiny, edible pomegranates.  Where not hardy makes good container plant and bonsai.

    Size: 2-4’ x 2-4’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Europe to Himalayas

    “The plants will bear miniature fruit if grown in areas with year-round temperatures rarely fall below 40° F. To grow indoors, moderate night-time temperatures should be given (50° to 60° F). Keep at 40° to 45° F in winter until new growth appears. In the growing period, keep moderately moist. Water sparingly from August on. This plant requires good drainage. Plants will bear fruit indoors if grown in a sunny exposure.”  Missouri Botanic Garden.   This dwarf described in 1803.

  • Ranunculus acris ‘Flora-pleno’ Meadow buttercup  Z 4-8 POISON

    Scads of cheerful yellow balls made from many petals, bloom in early spring. Excellent cut flower

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Scads of cheerful yellow balls made from many petals, bloom in early spring. Excellent cut flower

    Size: 18-24” x 12” slowly spreading
    Care: Sun to part sun in moist soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant, attract butterflies
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Ranunculus is Latin for little frog, so named by Roman Pliny  referring to the wet conditions required by some ranunculus.  William Robinson considered this “pretty.” The English Flower Garden 1899.

  • Rumex sanguineus ssp. sanguineus Bloody dock Z 5-8

    ornamental green foliage embroidered with red veins

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Grown for its ornamental green foliage embroidered with red veins.  Use in containers or borders for bold effect. Young leaves of this Sorrel edible – taste like Chard. Adds color to salads & makes fine soup.

    Size: 12" x 12"
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: uncommon sport of species from Europe, SW Asia & N. Africa

    Sanguineus means “blood-red”, from Latin sanguis, meaning “blood.”  In gardens by 1760’s.

  • Salix discolor Pussy willow Z 4-8

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Size: 15-20’ x 12-15’
    Care: full sun, prefers moist soil but tolerates well-drained soil
    Native: E. No. America incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Important food source for many pollinator bees incl. honey bees. Pussy willows attract queens looking for a location for a new colony. Host to caterpillars of cecropia moth and red-spotted purple, tiger swallowtail & viceroy butterflies.

    The name Salix is from “salio” meaning “to leap or dance, because of its quick growth.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768. This species introduced to cultivation by German plant hunter Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg in late 1700’s-early 1800’s. Willows contain salicin, the pain-killer in aspirin, and used since ancient Greece to relieve pain.

  • Sanguisorba tenuifolia Great burnet, Japanese burnet Z 4-8

    One to two inch long spikes - purplish red, in late summer

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    One to two inch long spikes – purplish red, in late summer

    Size: 4-6’ x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Asia

    Sanguisorba is Latin meaning to soak up blood, for the plant’s reputed ability to clot blood.

    Collected by 1851.

  • Schizophragma hydrangeoides ‘Rosea’ Pink Japanese hydrangea vine Z 5-8

    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK
    Note: This is a plant not currently for sale.  This is an archive page preserved for informational use.

    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

    Size: 20-30’ x 6-9’
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan where they “climb the trunks of tall trees and blossom among the lower limbs.” Arnold Arboretum Bulletin 1933.
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    ‘Rosea’ found by English planthunter Charles Maries c. 1878, collecting for London’s Veitch Nursery and referred to in The Book of Climbing Plants and Wall Shrubs, Samuel Arnett 1902.