Woody Ornamentals

Showing 13–16 of 48 results

  • Cercis canadensis, Red bud, Judas tree. Z 4-8

    In spring when we need a Dionysian jolt from winter’s hibernation the Red bud’s flowers burst open. Shameless fuchsia buds appear along the tree’s stems, before the leaves unfurl. As spring turns to summer, glossy medium green hearts, the shape of each leaf, replace the buds. Vase shaped, fast growing and blooming as a young tree.

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    Cercis canadensis, Red bud, Judas tree. Z 4-8
    In spring when we need a Dionysian jolt from winter’s hibernation the Red bud’s flowers burst open. Shameless fuchsia buds appear along the tree’s stems, before the leaves unfurl. As spring turns to summer, glossy medium green hearts, the shape of each leaf, replace the buds. Vase shaped, fast growing and blooming as a young tree. It has a tap root, making transplant a challenge, except when young.

    Size: 20-30’ tall and 25-35’ wide
    Care: sun to part shade and moist well drained soil.
    Native: between NY northwest to Wisconsin, Florida and southwest to New Mexico. Oklahoma adopted it as its state tree. Its immunity to the toxin Juglone means it can be planted near Walnut trees
    Wildlife Value: Spring Azure, Henry’s Elfin & Great Purple Hairstreak butterflies drink flowers’ nectar

    1st described by French explorer and botanist Joseph PittonTournefort in 1716. Collected by John Bartram. George Washington planted this at Mount Vernon. Cherokee and Delaware steeped Red bud roots and bark in water for cures of fever, stuffiness, whooping cough and vomiting. Cherokee children ate the flowers. French Canadians added them to salads. The Garden May 20, 1876.

  • Clematis stans Japanese clematis Z 4-8

    soulful blue starry nodding bells

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Clematis stans    Japanese clematis   Z 4-8
    Fragrant, smelling of sweet violets, soulful blue starry nodding bells with petals that flip up at the ends (recurved) Blooms August – September.  Ships only in  spring

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan

    Stans means “upright” as this is a bush, rather than a vine. (OK, we’ve put this in the vine category and it’s not a vine.  But most people think of Clematis as vines and we didn’t want you to miss it.) In Japan called “Kusa-botan.” Collected by Ernest Henry ‘Chinese’ Wilson before 1910.

  • Cornus alternifolia Pagoda dogwood Z 4-7

    Small tree with horizontal branches in flat tiers & a flat top, like the roof of a pagoda, bearing fragrant white flowers in early summer & blue berries on red stems against maroon leaves in fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Cornus alternifolia Pagoda dogwood Z 4-7
    Small tree with horizontal branches in flat tiers & a flat top, like the roof of a pagoda, bearing fragrant white flowers in early summer & blue berries on red stems against maroon leaves in fall.

    Size: 15-30’ x 15-30’
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil – great understory tree.
    Native: Canada to GA, west to MN – WI native
    Wildlife Value: Spring azure butterfly caterpillar. 34+ birds (incl. Northern flicker, Woodpeckers & Bluebirds,) eat the fruits.
    Awards: Great Plants for Great Plains

    Alternifolia means leaves alternating on stem. Collected before 1753. Cherokee chewed bark for headaches, sore throat, worms, measles & diarrhea. Poltice topically applied on ulcers & a decoction for colds & cough.

  • Cornus kousa Kousa dogwood Z. 5-8

    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

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    Cornus kousa Kousa dogwood        Z. 5-8
    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

    Size: 15’ x 15’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil Prune: little required, done in late winter
    Native: Asia
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Called Yamaboushi in its native Japan. In 1861 George Rogers Hall, residing in Yokohama, sent the 1st Cornus kousa seed to America from Japan. Francis Parkman sowed the seeds in his garden in Jamaica Plain MA garden. By the 1890’s 2 nurseries sold it in the U.S. – Parsons & Sons Co. and Yokohama Nursery. “Chinese” Wilson introduced the variety var. chinensis from Hupei Province in central China in 1907.