Woody Ornamentals

Showing 17–20 of 52 results

  • Cornus kousa Kousa dogwood Z. 5-8

    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

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    Cornus kousa Kousa dogwood        Z. 5-8
    Audacious, snow white 4” bracts for 4-6 weeks in June & July cover shrub’s horizontal branches, followed by crimson fruit in late summer & scarlet foliage in fall.

    Size: 15’ x 15’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil Prune: little required, done in late winter
    Native: Asia
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Called Yamaboushi in its native Japan. In 1861 George Rogers Hall, residing in Yokohama, sent the 1st Cornus kousa seed to America from Japan. Francis Parkman sowed the seeds in his garden in Jamaica Plain MA garden. By the 1890’s 2 nurseries sold it in the U.S. – Parsons & Sons Co. and Yokohama Nursery. “Chinese” Wilson introduced the variety var. chinensis from Hupei Province in central China in 1907.

  • Corylus americana American Hazelnut, Filbert Z 4-9

    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3" long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

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    $14.95/bareroot

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    Corylus americana   American Hazelnut, Filbert   Z 4-9
    In spring, showy male flowers on 2-3″ long catkins. Female flowers appear in small, reddish catkins grow into half inch long, egg-shaped edible nuts. Fall color ranges from orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green.

    Size: 10-16’ x 8-1’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: E. North America including Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: Exceptionally high value to wildlife. Pheasant, Quail, Turkey, Grouse, Turkey & Blue Jay and small animals eat the nuts. Pollen source for bees, host to many caterpillars both butterflies and moths. Branches make good nesting sites for songbirds. Black walnut tolerant.

    Described by Thomas Walter in 1788. Food for several Native American tribes. Medicinal for Cherokee, Iroquois, Menominee, Meskwaki and Ojibwa, to remedy hives, fever, headaches, pain of baby’s teething, hay fever and induce vomiting.

  • Cotoneaster apiculatus Cranberry cotoneaster Z 5-7

    White flowers followed by bright red berries lasting all winter. Glossy, leathery foliage tinges bronze in fall.

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    Cotoneaster apiculatus  Cranberry cotoneaster    Z 5-7
    White flowers followed by bright red berries lasting all winter. Glossy, leathery foliage tinges bronze in fall.

    Size: 3’ x 7’
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained soil. Blooms on new wood so can prune in spring. Pruning promotes bushy plant and increased flowering.
    Native: SW China

    Collected by E.H.Wilson before 1916 who described it as “forming neat mounds . . . straddled with scarlet berries in the fall and winter.”

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.

  • Cotoneaster multiflorus Showy cotoneaster Z 4-8

    Big specimen fountain-shaped shrub with arching stems covered with small leaves, in spring large white flowers and in fall yellow leaves set off spectacular red fruit persisting into winter. Great screen plant.

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    Cotoneaster multiflorus  Showy cotoneaster  Z 4-8
    Big specimen fountain-shaped shrub with arching stems covered with small leaves, in spring large white  flowers and in fall yellow leaves set off spectacular red fruit persisting into winter. Great screen plant.

    Size: 10’ x 10’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Western China.

    In China called shui xun zi. Collected by 1830.

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.