Woody Ornamentals

Showing 33–40 of 58 results

  • Hydrangea quercifolia Oakleaf hydrangea Z 5-9

    Large blossoms, white turning pink and dark rose as the season advances. In fall the oak-shaped leaves become burgundy.

    $13.95/bareroot

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    Large blossoms, white turning pink and dark rose as the season advances. In fall the oak-shaped leaves become burgundy.

    Size: 4-5’ x 10’ slowly spreading by suckers.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE US

    Collected in central Georgia by William Bartram c. 1775. Bartram, “most significant American nature writer before Thoreau,” traveled the wilderness of the SE, then colonies, now US, mostly alone, sometimes with his famous father, John Bartram. William wrote about and painted the flora, native Americans, animals and insects.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Hypericum kalmianum Kalm’s St. Johns wort SHRUB Z 4-7

    Yellow saucers with a puff of showy stamens in mid to late summer

    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Yellow saucers with a puff of showy stamens in mid to late summer, compliment the glaucous blue leaves on this small mounding, evergreen shrub.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun to shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Blooms on new growth so prune in late winter to early spring as far back as you wish.
    Native: Quebec to WI, S. to IL
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and butterflies
    Awards: Great Plants for Great Plains

    The name Hypericum comes from Greek hyper  meaning “above”, and eikon, meaning “icon or image”. The yellow flowers of some species were placed above images to ward off evil spirits, and according to legend, Satan pierced the leaves in revenge. This species collected by & named for Peter Kalm, Swedish plant hunter, on his expedition in North America before 1753.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex decidua Possumhaw, Yaupon, Meadow holly Z 5-9

    The beauty is in the berries, orange-red berries ripen in September and persist throughout the winter to dazzle the landscape, until mid-March when new growth begins on this small, deciduous tree.

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    The beauty is in the berries, orange-red berries ripen in September and persist throughout the winter to dazzle the landscape,  until mid-March when new growth begins on this small, deciduous tree.

    Size: 10-15’ x 10-15’
    Care: sun to part-shade in acidic, moist to moist well-drained soil, OK in clay
    Native: SE & Central US
    Wildlife Value: The fruit attracts birds, deer and some small mammals, including opossums, but is poisonous to people.
    Awards: Oklahoma Proven 2001

    Described in literature in 1788.
    Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex verticillata Winterberry holly Z 3-9 FEMALE

    White flowers in May turning to dense clusters of lurid red berries lasting from fall into winter.

    $15.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    White flowers in May turning to dense clusters of lurid red berries lasting from fall into winter.

    Size: 6-16’ x 6-10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Canada to FL, West to Wisconsin and MO.
    Wildlife Value: important food for winter birds incl. Robins & Chickadees

    Collected before 1753 by John Bartram who called it “Prinos.” Jefferson described the Winterberry on March 1 in Virginia, “the swamps in this neighborhood are now red with this berry…(it is) peculiar to America and is a real treasure.” L H Bailey (1933) called it,”one of the best hardy shrubs with ornamental fruits.” Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    Require a male and female plant for cross pollination.  This is the female plant that will produce the berries.  Generally only 1 male shrub should be needed to pollinate 6-10 female shrubs.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex verticillata Winterberry holly Z 3-9 MALE

    White flowers in May.

    $14.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    White flowers in May.  Male plants will not produce berries, but a Male shrub is needed to pollinate the female shrubs.

    Size: 6-16’ x 6-10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Canada to FL, West to Wisconsin and MO.

    Collected before 1753 by John Bartram who called it “Prinos.” Jefferson described the Winterberry on March 1 in Virginia, “the swamps in this neighborhood are now red with this berry…(it is) peculiar to America and is a real treasure.” L H Bailey (1933) called it,”one of the best hardy shrubs with ornamental fruits.” Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    Require a male and female plant for cross pollination.  This is the male plant needed to pollinate the females.  Generally only 1 male shrub should be needed to pollinate 6-10 female shrubs.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Kolkwitzia amabilis Beautybush Z. 5-9 SHRUB

    Profuse pale to dark pink bell flowers with yellow throats grace this arching shrub in early summer

    $18.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY.

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    Profuse pale to dark pink bell flowers with yellow throats grace this arching shrub in early summer

     

    Size: 10’ x 12’
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Flowers on last season’s wood so prune just after blooms fade.
    Native: China

    Named for Richard Kolkwitz, botany professor in Berlin.  First introduced to the West by Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson who found it in the mountains near Ichang and sent its seeds to the Veitch Nursery in England in 1901. Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum received the shrub in 1907.  It was one of Wilson’s favorite plants out of his hundreds of finds.  Wilson wrote, “(a)mong the deciduous-leaved shrubs that central and western China has given to American gardens Kolkwitzia stands in the front rank.”  Arnoldia 68/2.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’ Z 5-9

    Very fragrant, compact form of Lavender

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    $8.75/bareroot

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    Very fragrant, compact form of Lavender, blooms in wands July-September.  Remove faded flowers for rebloom.

    Size: 12-18” x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, well-drained, soil. Prune to 8” in spring every 2 years to control plant size and promote new growth.
    Native: Species native to Western Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: resistant to rabbits and deer

    This selection introduced to gardens in 1916. Named for Munstead Woods in England, the home of extraordinary garden designer Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932)  Lavandula is Latin from lavare meaning “to wash” “because it was used to be thrown into baths for the fragrancy of the scent; or because used in lye to give a fragrancy to linen; and because it is very good to wash the face with, and give it both beauty and a grateful scent.”

  • Lavandula angustifolia Lavender Z 5-9

    Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer.

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    The best fragrance – in both flowers & foliage. Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer.

    Size: 24" x 4'
    Care: Sun, well-drained soil. Well-drained soil essential. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Western Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Name is from Latin lavare meaning “to wash” because Romans scented their baths with lavender. Ancient Phoenicians used lavender to make perfume. Charlemagne’s list of cultivated plants in his empire included lavender, c. 800 A.D. Cultivated in Islamic gardens by 1050. Elizabeth I ate lavender conserve, made by adding sugar to the flowers while Charles VI of France stuffed pillows with lavender and sat on them. Culpepper wrote that lavender was grown in almost every garden and cured headaches, apoplexy, dropsy, fainting, toothaches, and “passions of the heart.”