Perennials & Biennials

Showing 145–148 of 529 results

  • Cryptotaenia japonica ‘Atropurpurea’ Purple-leaved Japanese Wild Parsley, Japanese honeywort Z 4-7

    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Flowers light pink small umbels in mid-summer but forget the flowers and grow this for its showy purple bronze stems and leaves, branched stems with deeply divided, compound leaves and slightly ruffled edges

    Size: 18-24" x 8" and self-seeds to make clumps
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: eastern Asia

    1st described in Journal of Japanese Botany in 1926. Asians use Honeywort as a seasoning, a strengthening tonic and eat its sprouts in salads but toxic if eaten in large quantities.
    CAUTION: may cause dermatitis with repeated contact in some people; toxic if eaten in large quantities.

  • Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ Tender perennial

    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost,

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    Fiery red, sem-double flowers atop reliably purple foliage from July until frost

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: moist well drained soil in full sun – lift bulb in fall, overwinter in basement
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit – 1928.

    Dahlias originally grown as food by Aztecs. 1st collected for the West by Spaniards in Mexico in 1615. The genus named after Dr. Anders Dahl, a student of Linnaeus and later a Swedish botanist in his own right. This cultivar came from a batch of chance seedlings in the nursery of breeder Fred Treseder in Wales UK. Treseder offered this and a few others to Bishop Joshua Hughes of Llandaff in 1924.

  • Dalea aurea syn Parosela aurea Golden prairie clover Z 5-9

    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

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    Cone-shaped fuzzy yellow flower spikes rise above sparse foliage in April-June

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’
    Care: sun in dry soil
    Native: West US from TX to WY
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies
    Size: Native Americans used Golden Prairie-clover to treat diarrhea and colic

    Collected and described by Thomas Nuttall, 1813.

     

  • Dalea purpurea syn. Petalostemon purpurea Violet prairie clover

    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads.

    Size: 2’ x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Canada to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Dogface Sulphur, Striped blue & Mexican blue butterflies.

    Dalea named to honor English botanist Dr. Samuel Dale (1659- 1739.)  Chippewa, Meskwaki and Navajo used medicinally – as remedies for heart ailments, pneumonia, diarrhea and measles.  Comanche and Lakota chewed the root like gum, for its sweet taste.  Pawnee made brooms from the flexible stems.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.  Bailey described the flowers: “a constant succession of showy spikes of flowers…”(1933)