Our Plants

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  • Syneilesis aconitifolia  syn. Senecio aconitifolia Shredded umbrella plant; in China, tu er san  Z 3-8

    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade.  I guess “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

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    Grown for its excellent foliage in dry shade. “Shredded umbrella” best describes this plant with thin, dissected leaves atop a leafless stem. Drooping in a rounded shape, like an umbrella, but it wouldn’t shelter from rain. Pale pink to white flowers in early to mid-summer.

    Size: 3’ x 2’, spreads slowly by rhizomes
    Care: part to full shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established. 
    Native: China, Korea & Japan and eastern Russia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Deer and rabbit resistant.

    Described in Flora of China in 1833. Chinese used the whole plant for medicine, to relax and activate the tendons, alleviate pain around the waist and legs, and to treat most any injuries.

  • Synthyris missourica Mountain Kittentails Z 5-9

    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

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    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

    Size: 5-12” x 12” spreading into clumps by rhizomes.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains of northeast CA, Washington, Idaho & west to Montana

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on June 26, 1806 in today’s Idaho near the headwaters of what they named Hungry Creek. Common name kittentails imaginatively named for the flower stalk and its protruding stamens resembling, if you squint real hard and maybe after taking a swig of whiskey,  fuzzy, blue kitten tails.

  • Talinum calycinum syn. Phemeranthus calycinus Rock rose, Fameflower Z 6-9

    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

    $9.95/2" pot

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    Tender reseeding perennial, but they survived the horrible winter of 2013-14. In any event they reseed reliably. Just watch for little succulent leaves.

    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

    Size: 8-12” x 4”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: western Plains states

    Collected by Dr. Frederick Wislizenus on sandy soil near the Cimarron River on an exploring trip of Texas, New Mexico and Mexico in 1846.   Wislizenus (1810-1889) was a German immigrant, explorer a, botanist and medical partner of George Engelmann (1809-1884) important promoter of plant-hunting and expert on cacti and conifers.

  • Talinum paniculatum ‘Limon’ Jewels of Opar ANNUAL Succulent sub-shrub Z 9-11

    Pink flowers bloom June-Nov. above lime green foliage followed by carmine seed pods that are more showy than the flowers.

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    Pink flowers bloom June-Nov. above lime green foliage followed by carmine seed pods that are more showy than the flowers.

    Size: 18-24” x 18-24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: Southern US, much of Latin America and the Caribbean.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees

    Leaves are edible as a salad green; seeds compared with flax seeds in nutritional value. According to homeopathy this used to treat headaches, aphrodisiacs, pneumonia, diarrhea, excess urine, irregular menstruation, vaginal discharge, impotence, ulcers and low appetite.

    Collected before 1791

  • Tanacetum armenum syn. Leucanthemum armenum Snow daisy

    Dwarf subshrub covered with mound of silvery foliage and little white daisies in June to July

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    Dwarf subshrub covered with mound of silvery foliage and little white daisies in June to July

    Size: 5-6” x 8-10”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Turkey

    Collected before 1844

  • Tanacetum niveum Silver tansy, Snow tansy Z 5-9

    Profusion of small classic daisies May-July atop fragrant silver foliage. Cut back for rebloom. Let the seeds drop for more plants next year. If you cut them back after the 1st flowering they will rebloom for most of the summer and fall.

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Profusion of small classic daisies May-July atop fragrant silver foliage. Cut back for rebloom. Let the seeds drop for more plants next year. If you cut them back after the 1st flowering they will rebloom for most of the summer and fall.

    Size: 2’ x 3’
    Care: sun in moist well drained soil
    Native: central & southern Europe

    Named by Carl Heinrich Schultz (1805-1867)

  • Telekia speciosa syn. Buphthalum speciosum Z 3-7

    Big, sunflower-like blooms but with the thinnest of petals, deep yellow, with orange-yellow centers. Flowers June-July. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 1836, “copious blooms.”

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    Big, sunflower-like blooms but with the thinnest of petals, deep yellow, with orange-yellow centers. Flowers June-July. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 1836, “copious blooms.”

    Size: 4-5’ x 2-3’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of southern Europe

    Grown by Philip Miller in 1739, head gardener at London’s Chelsea Physic Garden, per 1836 Curtis’s Botanical Magazine.

  • Tellima grandiflora Fringecups Z 4-8

    Pixie whitish fringed cups

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    Pixie whitish fringed cups bloom on 2′ tall panicle from May to July.

    Size: 12"x 8"
    Care: Part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest to Alaska

    Nitinaht Indians of Vancouver Island and Canadian Indians chewed this as a panacea and also to prevent a person from dreaming about necrophilia.  The western Washington Skagit Indians took a mixture including pounded Fringecup to enhance appetite and to heal all ailments.  1st collected by Scotsman Archibald Menzies around 1790 on the Vancouver expedition.  Introduced to gardens in 1826.