Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 105–112 of 145 results

  • Pennisetum orientale Oriental fountain grass Z 5-10

    Showy, white to pinkish inflorescences summer thru fall.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Showy, white to pinkish inflorescences summer thru fall.  Richard Darke, grass guru, describes this as “One of the most striking hardy fountain grasses.  Low growing, compact and exceptionally floriferous … Blooms over an unusually long period from late June through October”

    Size: 2' x 2'
    Care: sun in well-drained soil or moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant and drought tolerant.
    Native: central & SW Asia
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    The plant is named for its soft inflorescences; Latin penna and seta mean feather-bristle. This species collected before 1821.

  • Penstemon grandiflorus Large beard tongue Z 3-9

    Large pink to lavender trumpets

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Large pink to lavender trumpets along the 3’ stem in early summer

    Size: 3’ x 10”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: IL to N. Dakota, south to TX, Wisconsin
    Wildlife Value: attracts Baltimore butterfly

    Discovered by Thomas Nuttall, describing it as “splendid and beautiful,”on his trip up the Missouri River in 1811. Cured chest pains and stomach aches for the Dakota and chills and fever for the Pawnee.

  • Penstemon strictus Rocky Mountain penstemon Z 3-8

    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer.  Great cut flower

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Wyoming to Arizona
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek. Strictus means “erect.” This species introduced before 1884.

  • Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian sage Z 5-9

    Showy subshrub with tall spikes covered by tiny lavender blue tubes

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Showy subshrub with tall spikes covered by tiny lavender blue tubes from July to October. One of the best shrubby plants with its graceful form, its tough constitution and long bloom.

    Size: 4' x 3'
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant, deer resistant.
    Native: Afghanistan
    Awards: Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden and Perennial Plant Association 1995 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Perovskia was named for V.A. Perovski, governor of a Russian province in central Asia around 1890. Introduced to American gardens in 1904. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll in 1908.

  • Petrophytum caespitosum Mat rock Spiraea Z 4-9

    Tight cushions bearing white spikes August-September.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Tight cushions bearing white spikes August-September. Its roots penetrate rock crevices and cracks

    Size: 4” x 4-6’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant. Do not allow leaf litter to cover it.
    Native: Sierras to Rocky Mountains

    Collected by premier plant hunter Thomas Nuttall 1834-1837 on his exploration across the continent to the Pacific “on high shelving rocks in the Rocky Mountains, towards the sources of the Platte.”

  • Polygonatum multiflorum Solomon’s seal Z 4-10

    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems

    $11.45/bareroot

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    Polygonatum multiflorum  Solomon’s seal  Z 4-10
    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems in June followed by black fruit, the leaves “make a fine mass of elegant foliage,” Sanders, 1913.

    Size: 3' x 10"
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil Drought tolerant. Immune to Walnut toxins.
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Dioscorides named Polygonatum in the 1st century, which means “many jointed” referring to scars on the rhizome.  Medieval herbalists opined that Biblical figure Solomon put scars on the rhizome to demonstrate the plant’s curative powers.  P. multiflorum cultivated in English gardens by 1450.  In 1596 English herbalist Gerard endorsed its use to repair broken bones – mix the pulverized root and drink it with ale to “gleweth together the bones in very short space.”  He also claimed fresh stamped root of Polygonatum would cure cuts and bruises for “women’s willfulness in stumbling on their hasty husband’s fists.” According to Culpepper Italian wives “much used” this remedy.

  • Potentilla atrosanguinea Himalayan cinquefoil Z 5-8

    Sun in well drained soil Z 5-8

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Summer to autumn, ruby to pumpkin-colored blossoms shaped like a single petal rose, top pleated silvery foliage.

    Size: 18-36" x 24"
    Care: Sun well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Himalayas

    Potentilla is Latin meaning powerful referring to medicinal properties. Potentillas used by dentists in the 16th century to reduce pain according to Gerard, English herbalist.  Per Culpepper, 17th century English herbalist, potentilla is to be used if Jupiter is ascending and the moon is “applying to him.” Astrosanguinea introduced to garden cultivation in the 1820’s.

  • Potentilla rupestris syn. Drymocallis rupestris Rock cinquefoil, Siberian tea Z 5-8

    White, single rose-like saucer flowers with prominent yellow stamens in early summer.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    White, single rose-like saucer flowers with prominent yellow stamens in early summer.

    Size: 10-20" x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe, Asia & mountains of western No. America

    Potentilla is Latin meaning “powerful” referring to medicinal properties.  Rupestris means “rock loving.”  This species in gardens before 1753.  Russians used the leaves to brew tea.