Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 121–128 of 155 results

  • Salvia nemorosa Meadow sage, Balkan clary Z 5-7

    Purple/lavender spire dense with flowers June to September

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Dense purple spires flower June to September (if cutback after 1st flush of flowers).

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe to Central Asia.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies & hummingbirds

    Salvia is from the Latin word salveo meaning “to heal” referring to the plant’s ancient medicinal uses. Collected before 1753.

  • Salvia nutans Nodding sage Z 5-8

    Nodding clumps of sky blue flowers high over basal leaves, flower in late spring-early summer.

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Nodding clumps of sky blue flowers high over basal leaves, flower in late spring-early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil.
    Native: Balkans
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies seeking pollen and nectar. Deer resistant.

    Collected before 1753. Introduced to gardens in 1780 by Peter Simon Pallas (1741-1811) Berlin botanist who collected extensively in Russia. Grown in nursery of Joseph Knight, King’s Road, London. Pictured in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine Vol. 50, 1822.

  • Salvia sclarea Clary sage Reseeding Biennial Z 5-9

    Extraordinary pastel panicles of cream, blue or pink, bi-toned bracts whorl around the stem spring – summer

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Extraordinary pastel panicles of cream, blue or pink, bi-toned bracts whorl around the stem spring – summer

    Can not ship to: Washington

    Size: 3’ x 12”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe to Central Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Deer resistant.

    Salvia is from the Latin salveo meaning “to heal” referring to the plant’s ancient medicinal uses.  This species introduced to gardens from the south of Europe in 1562.

  • Salvia verticillata Lilac sage, whorley clary, Salbey Z 5-8

    Muted lilac blue spikes June to October

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Muted lilac blue spikes June to October, deadhead for more blooms.

    Size: 24” x 18-24”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Cut back after first bloom to repeat.
    Native: Spain to Ukraine, Caucasus to Iran
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet.

    Salvia is from the Latin “salveo” meaning “to heal” referring to the plant’s ancient medicinal uses.  This species collected before 1753. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

  • Salvia yangii syn. Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian sage Z 5-9

    Whorls of sky-blue flowers cover innumerable stems and their many branches creating a blue cloud from July through October

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Whorls of sky-blue flowers cover innumerable stems and their many branches creating a blue cloud from July through October

    Size: 4' x 4'
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil, Heat and drought tolerant. Cut back in spring.
    Native: Afghanistan
    Wildlife Value: deer & rabbit resistant, Feeds bees and honeybees
    Awards: Great Plant Pick Award from Elizabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden and Perennial Plant Association 1995 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Perovskia was named for V.A. Perovski, governor of a Russian province in central Asia around 1890. Introduced to American gardens in 1904. Recommended by English garden maven Gertrude Jekyll in 1908.

  • Sambucus canadensis syn. Sambucus nigra var. canadensis. Elderberry, American elderberry Z 3-9

    In late spring to mid-summer lavish, fragrant flat-to dome-shaped clusters of flowers bloom above this arching, multi-stemmed shrub. Late summer into fall the multitude of flowers turn into purple-black, edible fruits, up to 2000 per cluster!

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    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    In late spring to mid-summer lavish, fragrant flat-to dome-shaped clusters of flowers bloom above this arching, multi-stemmed shrub. Late summer into fall the multitude of flowers turn into purple-black, edible fruits, up to 2000 per cluster!

    Size: 5-12’ x spreading quickly by suckers. Best to grow as hedge, along a roadside, fence-line or forest edge.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to well-drained soil
    Native: Americas east of Rocky Mountains south to Bolivia. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: branches and leaves make nesting sites and give cover for birds.. Many birds (including, Pheasant, Bluebird, Cedar waxwing, Cardinal, Mockingbird and others) as well as some mammals eat the sweet, but slightly bitter, fruit. It is a source of pollen for numerous bees and other insects.

    Collected before 1735. Native Americans made extensive use of this, Cherokee used it topically for boils, burns and infections and internally for rheumatism, fevers, dropsy, as   a diuretic, and of course ate the berries.  Costanoan made its hollow twigs into pipes, flutes and shafts for arrows. Several Natives infused the flowers and foliage with hot water to make steam baths. And many natives ate it, boiled it, jammed it, and added the fruit to cakes. Today people eat them in jellies, jams, pancakes, pies and wine and make homeopathic medicine from it. Reportedly ripe berries are high in vitamin C and fiber. It’s also an antioxidant.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Sanguinaria canadensis Bloodroot, Indian paint, Red Puccoon Z 3-9

    Very showy, swan-white anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, grey-green, lobed, puckered, rolled leaves. Both the leaves and root contain a red liquid. Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    $9.75/pot

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    Available for purchase in Spring only

    Very showy, swan-white anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, grey-green, lobed, puckered, rolled leaves. Both the leaves and root contain a red liquid. (Bloodroot) Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to Manitoba, south to Florida and Arkansas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer resistant. Pollen, but no nectar, makes this attractive to many different bees. Ants distribute the seeds.

    Sanguinaria is Latin meaning “blood,” so named for the red color of the sap.  For Natives red sap used to make dye for skin, clothing, weapons and baskets.  Used to induce abortions, as well as an aphrodisiac and cure sexually transmitted diseases. The root rubbed on the palm of the hand was a love charm for Ponca men.   Iroquois prescribed it for diarrhea and constipation, to draw out slivers, hiccups, and generally as a panacea.  It was administered to those who saw a corpse.  Sioux used a weak solution to cure fever, rheumatism, congestion, and skin cancer, Ojibwa made dried roots into a necklace to prevent bleeding.  1st collected by Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1678. According to John Bartram this was “…(C)alled by the Country People, Red Root, or Tumerick  The Root dried and powdered is recommenced by Dr. Colden, as a Cure for jaundice, the Powder has been given to the Weight of a Drachm in Small Beer; and by others, for the Bite of a Rattle Snake.”   Grown at Shadwell, Jefferson’s birthplace and home until it burned in 1770.  Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811, located where Rockefeller Center now stands.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Schizachyrium scoparium syn. Andropogon scoparium Little bluestem Z 5-9

    Wispy, feather-like seedheads atop blue-grey foliage that turns plum-orange-red in fall.

    $12.75/bareroot

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    Wispy, feather-like seedheads atop blue-grey foliage that turns plum-orange-red in fall

    Size: 18" x 12"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil.
    Native: all No. America, Wisconsin native

    First collected by French plant hunter André Michaux in America’s prairies c. 1790.  Comanche used it to remedy syphilitic sores. Lakota made soft, wispy seedheads into liners for moccasins.