Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 41–44 of 157 results

  • Calamagrostis brachytricha Diamond grass, Feather reed grass

    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright plumes

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright pale pink plumes September to November

    Size: 4' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: East Asia

    Collected before 1856.

  • Calamagrostis x acutiflora”Karl Forester” Feather reed grass

    Completely, reliably erect grass - winner perennial plant of year award 2001.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Completely, reliably erect grass.

    Size: 3-5' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Cut back in late winter.
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of the Year 2001

    This is a natural cross of Calamagrostis epigeos and Calamagrostis arundinacea, natives of Asia and Europe.  German nurseryman Karl Forester’s (1874-1970) keen eye spotted this in the Hamburg Botanic Garden.   He listed this in his nursery catalog in 1939.  Under Nazi domination he risked it all by keeping Jewish friends & workers. After WW II his nursery was the only perennial supplier in East Germany.  This grass sent from Denmark to the US in 1964.

  • Caltha palustris Marsh marigold, Kingscup Zones 3-7

    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, acidic soil
    Native: Maine to No. Dakota S. to Tennessee
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds
    Size: Caltha is Latin meaning “cup” and palustris means “boggy” or “marsh.” America’s 1st people used the roots medicinally to cure colds and sores and to induce vomiting. The roots also protected against “love charms,” (but I suspect the vomiting might have accomplished that.) An infusion of leaves remedied constipation.

    Introduced to Europe very early and memorialized in Chaucer’s poetry, 1549. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.

    LH Bailey considered the flowers “very beautiful,” while Rand called them “very showy.” Wm. Robinson described them as “shin(ing) like fires in swamps and hollows.” Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.