Search Results for: bleeding heart vine

  • Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop

    Agastache foeniculum Anise hyssop Z 4-8 Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant...

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Agastache foeniculum  Anise hyssop Z 4-8
    Showy purple spikes from July to September, fragrant

    Size: 3-5' x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in well-drained soil, drought tolerant & deer resistant
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Agastache is from Greek agan and stachys meaning much like an ear of wheat referring to the shape of the flower spike. Anise hyssop leaves were used by American Indians of the Missouri River region to make tea and as a sweetener in cooking. The Cheyenne used it to relieve chest pain due to coughing or to a dispirited heart. Listed hyssop as an aromatic herb in McMahon’s 1805 book.

  • Digitalis purpurea Foxglove Z 4-8

    Early summer pink, purple or white spires of spotted bells. Beautiful.

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Early summer pink, purple or white spires of spotted bells. Beautiful.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Part shade moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Great Britain,west and central Europe east to Scandinavia, often escapes.

    Druids were fond of this Foxglove because it flowered at the same time as their midsummer sacrifice. First described by German physician and botanical author Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566). Grown in Medieval gardens. The plant’s use as a heart stimulant was discovered in 1775 by English physician William Withering. The word ‘fox’ is said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies,” having the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies.  Cultivated in America since 1700’s, with the first documented reference of American cultivation in 1748 by Peter Kalm, a student of Linneaus and a Swedish botanist who explored colonial America for plants. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Papaver orientale ‘Beauty of Livermere’ Z 3-9

    Glossy fire engine red petals with black heart in June....

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    Scarlet, tissue-thin petals surround a purple blotch at the base highlighted with purple stamens

    Size: 3' x 2'
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Foliage dies back in summer & reemerges in the cool autumn.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, bees & butterflies. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    This red selection listed in Matineau’s book 1910

  • Dalea purpurea syn. Petalostemon purpurea Violet prairie clover

    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads.

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Vase shaped clump with wands of violet to purple encircling tall coneheads.

    Size: 2’ x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Canada to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for caterpillars of Dogface Sulphur, Striped blue & Mexican blue butterflies.

    Dalea named to honor English botanist Dr. Samuel Dale (1659- 1739.)  Chippewa, Meskwaki and Navajo used medicinally – as remedies for heart ailments, pneumonia, diarrhea and measles.  Comanche and Lakota chewed the root like gum, for its sweet taste.  Pawnee made brooms from the flexible stems.  1st collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.  Bailey described the flowers: “a constant succession of showy spikes of flowers…”(1933)

  • Thalictrum dioicum Early meadowrue Z 5-9

    Hanging chartreuse blooms dangle from the stems in spring

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    Hanging chartreuse blooms dangle from the stems in spring

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: shade to part shade in moist or moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Quebec west to No. Dakota, south to Georgia, Wisconsin native

    Cherokee made an infusion of the root to cure nausea and diarrhea.  Iroquois used it to remedy sore eyes and heart palpitations.  The plant also would “make you crazy.”  1st collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Thomas Drummond collected this on the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains before 1800.

  • Crambe cordifolia Colewort Z. 5-9

    OUT OF STOCK Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June...

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    Giant profusion of white flowers from late May to June

    Size: 7-8’ x 5’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus

    First collected before 1863.  This is a stately and noble plant, with large heart shaped leaves.  The loose flower-heads, which are often 6 feet in height, and nearly as much through, are composed of myriads of small white flowers, which at a distance may be likened to a giant specimen of Gypsophila; it blooms during June and July.”  H.H. Thomas 1915.

  • Iris siberica Siberian Iris Z 4-9

    Narrow, sword shaped leaves with blue, purple, or white Iris flowers in June....

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    Narrow, sword shaped leaves with blue, purple, or white Iris flowers in June.

    Size: 3-4' x S 12" and spreading
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant, Walnut toxicity resistant and drought tolerant.
    Native: Eastern Siberia
    Awards: England's Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Iris is named after the Greek goddess who accompanied the souls of women to the Elysian Fields by way of the rainbow.  Her footprints left flowers the colors of the rainbow.   Iris means the “eye of heaven.” The iris is the flower of chivalry, having “a sword for its leaf and a lily for its heart.” Ruskin. Siberian Irises first cultivated in European gardens in the 1500’s.  Blue Siberian Iris was introduced to the U.S. in 1796.  Cultivated by Washington at Mount Vernon.

  • Iris ‘Polar King’ Z 4-8

    Pure white with yellow center, vigorous reblooming iris. Blooms spring and again, spectacularly, in fall....

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    Pure white with yellow center, vigorous reblooming iris.  Blooms spring and again, spectacularly, in fall.

    Size: 34”x8” Vigorous & spreads by rhizomes.
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. In July-August lift & divide every 2 to 3 years; discard mushy rhizomes.
    Awards: 1st rebloomer awarded American Iris Society Award of Merit

    Iris is named after the Greek goddess who accompanied the souls of women to the Elysian fields by way of the rainbow.  Her footprints left flowers the colors of the rainbow.   Iris means “eye of heaven.” The iris is the flower of chivalry, having “a sword for its leaf and a lily for its heart.” Ruskin.   This hybrid bred by Thomas Donahue of Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts. He 1st showed it at the Massachusetts Horticultural Society flower show in October of 1931 where it won several awards.  Registered in 1939.

  • Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7

    Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7 Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves....

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger    Z 3-7
    Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves.

    Size: 6" x 6" spreading
    Care: part shade to shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to North Carolina, Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used Wild ginger for such diverse purposes as flavoring food, cure heart palpitations, induce menstrual cycles, cure “the bite of the serpent,” mend broken bones and lure catfish. Colonists used the plant to break fever and stimulate the appetite.

  • Centranthus ruber Jupiter’s beard, red valerian Z 5-8

    OUT OF STOCK Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer....

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer.

    Size: 24-36”x 36”
    Care: Sun in well-drained alkaline soil
    Native: Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Centranthus is from the Greek meaning “spurred flower.”  According to Culpepper, an English herbalist from the early 1600’s, this plant comforts the heart and stirs up lust.  Parkinson, in 1629 describes it “of a fine red colour, very pleasant to behold.”