Search Results for: ferns

  • Athyrium filix-femina Lady fern Z 3-8

    Grown for its fern fronds, one of the easiest ferns to grow

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    Grown for its fern fronds, one of the easiest ferns to grow

    Size: 4’ x 2-4’
    Care: moist to well-drained soil in full to part shade
    Native: temperate No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1780’s. Mentioned by H.H. Thomas 1915 for gardens.

  • Athyrium filix femina ‘Victoriae’ Victoria lady fern Z 4-8

    Athyrium filix femina‘Victoriae’ Victoria lady fern Z 4-8 Finely divided fronds have tiny twisted leaves that cross one another. Vigorous grower. Dr. John Mickel, former curator of ferns at the...

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    Athyrium filix femina‘Victoriae’  Victoria lady fern Z 4-8
    Finely divided fronds have tiny twisted leaves that cross one another. Vigorous grower. Dr. John Mickel, former curator of ferns at the New York Botanical Garden, called this “the Queen of green.”  It’s like no other fern you’ve ever seen.

    Size: 18-24” x 18-24”
    Care: part to full shade in moist to moist well-drained soil

    Popular Victorian fern. Discovered in Scotland in 1861.

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z.4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)...

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.