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  • Anemone vitifolia ‘Robustissima’ Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and fall

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and early fall.

    Size: 30"x 36" spreader
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: early cultivated variety of A. vitifolia native to Nepal.

    The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.”  The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, used another species of Anemone to herald his coming in early spring. A. vitifolia first introduced from its native Nepal to European garden cultivation by Lady Amhurst in 1829.

  • Anemonella thalictroides Rue anemone, Windflower Z 4-7

    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    $8.25/pot

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    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: N.H through Ontario to Minn. Including WI, south to Florida & Kansas

    First described by Linnaeus – 1753. Philip Miller grew this in 1768. Named Anemonella because the flowers resemble those of the Amenome and thalictroides because the leaves resemble the leaves of the Thalictrum, Meadowrue. Native Americans ate the tuberous root for food and made a tea from Rue anemone by steeping the root in water. The tea supposedly cured flu-like symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting.

  • Angelica archangelica Biennial Z 4-9

    Spectacular chartreuse globular umbels

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Angelica archangelica Biennial –Reseeds readily  Z 4-9
    Spectacular chartreuse globular umbels of flowers in July

    Size: 6’ x 3’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Russia, Scandinavia

    Angelica is Latin for “angelic,” because an angel is said to have revealed to a monk that the plant cures the plague. Ancient – used medicinally for more than 2000 years.  Used to flavor reindeer milk in Scandinavia, to flavor perfume & liqueurs, and to make a French delicacy of candied stalks.  Add fresh leaves to your salad or make a tea from dried leaves.  Folklore claims it has angelic healing properties.  Introduced to England in 1625 by Tradescant the Elder who collected it on the island of Archangel in Russia.

  • Angelica gigas Giant angelica RESEEDING BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Dramatic, deep purple, spherical umbels in midsummer, purple stems

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Dramatic, deep purple, spherical umbels in midsummer, purple stems.  One of our favorites.

    Size: 4-6' x 4'
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountain streams in Korea

    1st collected by Japanese botanist Takenoshin Nakai (1882-1952) before 1917. Professor, author, scholar and official botanist for Korea in 1910 after Japan annexed Korea following the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars. There he explored the botanically unknown mountains and forests and introduced its plants to the world through his international contacts and authorship of Flora Koreana. Used in its native Korea to remedy “anaemia, hemiplegia and women’s diseases.” Korean name is Cham-dang-gui.

  • Angelica sylvestris ‘Purpurea’ Wild Angelica Self-seeding Biennial Z 4-9

    Wonderful deep purple stems and leaves with large umbels of purple-pink flowers late summer-early fall  

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Wonderful deep purple stems and leaves with large umbels of purple-pink flowers late summer-early fall

    Can not ship to : Maine

    Size: 6-8’ x 5'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe in moist woodlands and bogs.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and butterflies

    The species described in Species Plantarum 1: 251. 1753 (1 May 1753) by Linnaeus

  • Antennaria dioica Pussy toes Z 5-9

    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Pale pink “pussy-toe”, resembling the pads of a kitten’s foot, flowers in early summer, great silvery-gray foliage, good groundcover and rock garden plant.

    Size: 2” x 18”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Temperate areas worldwide

    Antennaria from the Latin antenna originally referring to the mast of a sailboat.  Part of the flower supposedly resembles a butterfly’s antennae.  Historically used for medicine as an astringent, a cough remedy and to break fever.  First described by German physician and botanical author Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566).  Gertrude Jekyll (1848-1931), mother of the mixed perennial border, planted this in her own rock garden at Munstead Wood and in the Sundial Garden at Pednor House in Buckinghamshire. The pink version, A. dioica rosea, collected in the Rocky Mountains by C.C. Parry before 1860.

  • Anthemis tinctoria Marguerite

    Cheerful yellow daisies all summer, non-stop.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Anthemis tinctoria   Marguerite, Golden camomile  Z 3-7
    Cheerful yellow daisies all summer, non-stop.

    Size: 2-3' x 2'
    Care: Full sun well-drained to moist well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: Eastern Europe

    This promiscuous flower sports maize colored daisies with ferny, aromatic foliage. The name Anthemis evolved from anthemon meaning “free flowering,” which describes the plant’s carefree, June through fall, blossoms. Philip Miller illustrated Marguerite in his 1750’s Dictionary. The flower was used to dye wool and to make tea.

  • Anthericum ramosum      Spider plant, Branched St Bernard’s-lily             Z 5-8

    White, branched flower clusters above grass-like leaves June-August

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    White, branched flower clusters above grass-like leaves June-August

     

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Western, Central & Southern Europe
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    Published by Linneaus in Species Plantarum  (1753)