Shop

Showing 613–616 of 655 results

  • Thermopsis caroliniana syn. Thermopsis villosa Carolina lupine Z 4-9

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

    Size: 4’ x 2’
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Drought & Heat tolerant.
    Native: forest openings in the Appalachians
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1843

  • Thermopsis lanceolata Lanceleaf thermopsis, Siberian lupin Z 3-8

    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: E. Asia, Siberia to Japan & Alaska

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;” lanceolata refers to the lance shaped leaves. Collected before 1753.

  • Thermopsis montana syn. T. rhombifolia Golden banner, False lupin Z 4-9

    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

    Placeholder

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

    Size: 24-36” x 18-24” & spreading by rhizomes
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;”because the flower looks like a yellow lupine. Collected in 1834 by plant hunter extraordinaire Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) on the trip to California, the Wyeth Expedition.

  • Thymus pseudolanuginosus Woolly thyme Z 4-8

    miniature, very hairy silver leaves, resembling wool. Lavender flowers in June.

    $8.25/pot

    Buy

    Grown as a groundcover or in rock gardens for its miniature, very hairy silver leaves, resembling wool.  Lavender flowers in June.

    Size: 1” x 12” spreading slowly
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant. Deer resistant
    Native: Europe

    1st mentioned in literature by Phillip Miller of Chelsea Physic Garden, 1771.