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  • Thymus serpyllum syn. Thymus praecox Mother-of-thyme, creeping thyme Z 4-9

    Short purple spikes in June-July

    $5.95/pot

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    Thymus serpyllum    syn. Thymus praecox  Mother-of-thyme, creeping thyme   Z 4-9
    Short purple spikes in June-July

    Size: 3” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe & Western Asia
    Size: groundcover, rock garden, herb, fragrant foliage, thyme lawn

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance.  Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.   This species since at least 1753. Acc’d to Parkinson in 1640 this remedied hysterics in women.  Wm. Robinson wrote,”nothing can be more charming than a sunny bank covered with” Thymus serpyllum.  LH Bailey extolled it as “prized as an evergreen edging and as cover for rockwork and waste places …The leaves are sometimes used for seasoning.”

  • Tiarella cordifolia Allegheny foam flower Z 3-9

    White spikes in spring, gorgeous en masse. Make a great groundcover for shade.

    $8.25/pot

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    White spikes in spring, gorgeous en masse. Make a great groundcover for shade.

    Size: 6-12”x 12-24” spreading
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Novia Scotia to Georgia, native to Wisconsin.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Tiarella is Latin meaning little tiara referring to the form of the pistil.   The common name is derived from the form of blossoms. Cherokee used this plant to remove the white coating on their tongues. For the Iroquois it increased the appetite of children and cured sores in their mouths. One of 1st No. American plants sent to Europe – grew in Tradescant the Elder’s South Lambeth nursery in 1634.  Liberty Hyde Botanist L.H. Bailey described Tiarella cordifolia as: ”An elegant plant well worthy of general culture.” Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Tradescantia bracteata Spiderwort Z. 4-9

    rosy purple flowers July-August

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    $9.95/bareroot

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    rosy purple flowers July-August

    Size: 12-18” x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: WY east to MI, south to OK, WI native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Genus named after John Tradescant the Younger, an English botanist, who introduced Tradescantia virginiana to garden cultivation in 1637, when he sent it to his father, gardener to King Charles I.   This prairie plant collected before 1938.

  • Tradescantia virginiana Spiderwort Z 4-9

    bluish lavender to purple 3 petaled stars with showy yellow stamens

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Prominent pendulous buds open to bluish lavender to purple 3-petaled stars with showy yellow stamens. Free blooming from June thru September.

    Size: 18-24" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: From New York to South Dakota, Virginia and Arkansas

    Named after English planthunter John Tradescant the Younger, who introduced this plant to garden cultivation in 1637.   Parkinson explains the origin of this plant: “This Spider-wort is of late knowledge, and for it the Christian world is indebted unto that painfull industrious searcher, and lover of all natures varieties, John Tradescant who first received it of a friend, that brought it out of Virginia,” (1639). Cherokee ate the young greens and prescribed it to cure stomachaches after overeating, female illnesses, cancer and insect bites.  Menominee revived those “defiled by touch of bereaved.” By 1659 ones with white, light blue and reddish flowers grown in England.