Search Results for: bleeding heart vine

  • Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair fern Z.4-9

    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)...

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    Grown for its delicate leaflets arranged in rows. One of internationally known garden designer Piet Oudolf’s 100 “MUST HAVE” plants, Gardens Illustrated 94 (2013)

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: Shade in moist soil
    Native: all parts of No. America including Wisconsin
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Adiantum is from Greek adiantos, unwettable because its fronds repel water.
    Cherokee made a tea for flu, fever and rheumatism, and powdered parts for heart ailments, paralysis and asthma. Native Americans made a hair wash from the stems and applied a topical poultice of masticated fronds to a wound to arrest bleeding. 1st described by French botanist Cornu (1635). Introduced to France from Canada where it grew in “such quantities that the French send it from thence in package for other goods and the apothecaries at Paris use it for (another Adiantum) in all their compositions in which that is ordered.” Philip Miller (1768). Tradescant the Younger introduced this fern to garden cultivation when he sent it to England around 1638. English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper claimed it to be “a good remedy for coughs, asthmas, pleurisy, etc., and on account of it’s being a gentle diuretic also in jaundice, gravel and other impurities of the kidneys.” Father of the mixed perennial border, William Robinson, called this “elegant.” It “is unquestionably one of the most distinct and beautiful of the hardy ferns.” The Garden 1876.

  • Vaccinium vitis-idaea Lingonberry, Mountain cranberry, Cowberry, Foxberry Z 2-7

    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

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    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

    Size: 6-12” x 3’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, very acidic soil
    Native: Boreal forest and Arctic tundra in Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America
    Size: Often made into jam, juice, syrup and relish. The berries contain high amounts of vitamin C, A and B1, B2, B3, as well as phytochemicals and omega-3 fatty acids. Historically used in folk medicine as an astringent, antihemorrhagic, anti-debilitive, depurative, antiseptic, diuretic, tonic for the nervous system, as well as treatment for breast cancer, diabetes, rheumatism, infections, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, urinary tract ailments and fever.

    The common name Lingonberry comes from the Norse word for heather, lyngr. Vitis- idaea comes from vitis which is Latin for vine and idaea meaning “from Mount Ida.” According to L.H. Bailey, “Throughout the whole of N. Canada, hunters and trappers, as well as the native Indians, have frequently depend on it for food. It is valuable for the shrubbery border, where the strong contrast of the dark green foliage and the bright colored persistent fruit is very striking.”

  • Clematis integrifolia Z 3-7

    Summer into fall, real true blue and sometimes white, pendant flowers measuring 2″ across....

    $13.95/bareroot

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    Summer into fall, real true blue and sometimes white,  pendant flowers measuring 2″ across.

    Size: 24" x 24"
    Care: Sun to part shade well-drained soil. Prune to near ground in early spring.
    Native: Central Europe

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant.  It’s not really a vine, it only gets 2′ tall, maybe 3′ and it doesn’t climb, but you can prop it up with a trellis or let it trail for a groundcover.  But it’s a Clematis and one of the best – blue most of the summer into fall & you can’t beat that. This species collected in Hungary by 1573.  English herbalist Gerard grew this plant by the late 1590’s.

  • Sanguinaria canadensis Bloodroot, Indian paint, Red Puccoon Z 3-9

    Available for purchase in Spring only White anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, rolled leaves Ephemeral, dies back in summer....

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    Available for purchase in Spring only

    White anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, rolled leaves Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to Manitoba, south to Florida and Arkansas

    Sanguinaria is Latin meaning “blood,” so named for the red color of the sap. Red sap used to make dye for skin, clothing, weapons and baskets. Used to induce abortions, as well as an aphrodesiac and to cure sexually transmitted disease. The root rubbed on the palm of the hand was a love charm for Ponca men.   Iroquois prescribed it for diarrhea and constipation, to draw out slivers, hiccups, and generally as a panacea. It was administered to those who saw a corpse. Ojibwa made dried roots into a necklace to prevent bleeding. 1st collected by Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.   According to John Bartram this was “…(C)alled by the Country People, Red Root, or Tumerick The Root dried and powdered is commenced by Dr. Colden, as a Cure for the jaundice, the Powder has been given to the Weight of a Drachm in Small Beer; and by others, for the Bit of a Rattle Snake.”    Grown at Shadwell, Jefferson’s birthplace and home until it burned in 1770. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Silphium perfoliatum Cup plant Z 3-9

    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe Can not ship to: Connecticut and New York...

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    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

    Can not ship to: Connecticut and New York

    Size: 7’ x 3’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Central North America, native to Wisconsin.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Sap used by Native Americans to chew and freshen breath.  Also used to cure colds, neuralgia, fever, and liver disorders.  The Chippewa used to stop lung hemorrhaging, menstrual bleeding and cure chest pain.  The Winnebago drank a potion from the plant to purify themselves before a buffalo hunt.  For the Iroquois it cured paralysis, prevented children from seeing ghosts and illness caused by the dead.  Goldfinches feast on the seeds in fall.

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October. Not invasive....

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    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.  Not invasive.

    Size: 5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil
    Native: Central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning “to bring together.”
    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859.)

  • Achillea nana Dwarf yarrow Z 4-7

    OUT OF STOCK Achillea nana Dwarf yarrow Z 4-7 White flowers over grey-green foliage blooms for nearly 2 months in summer....

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Achillea nana Dwarf yarrow Z 4-7
    White flowers over grey-green foliage blooms for nearly 2 months in summer.

    Size: 2-4” x spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of central Europe

    Collected before 1753. Philip Miller’s The Gardener’s Dictionary (1768) wrote that it is a “native of the Alps…very hardy … will thrive in any soil (and) deserve(s) a place in gardens.” Achillea named for Achilles, hero of Homer’s Illiad, used Achillea millefolium to stop bleeding of his wounded soldiers at the siege of Troy. Achilles learned about the uses of Achillea from Chiron, the Centaur. Nana means “dwarf.”

  • Achillea ageratifolia Greek yarrow Z. 4-8

    OUT OF STOCK Achillea ageratifolia Greek yarrow Z. 4-8 Silvery foliage smothered with porcelain white flowers June-August, fragrant...

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Achillea ageratifolia   Greek yarrow   Z. 4-8
    Silvery foliage smothered with porcelain white flowers June-August, fragrant

    Size: 6”x 18”
    Care: sun in dry to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Balkans, Greece & Yugoslavia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies, deer resistant.
    Size: Good in rock garden & troughs.

    Achillea named for Achilles who used Achillea millefolium to bandage bleeding wounds for his soldiers. According to Philip Miller (1768) Achillea’s common name is “Nosebleed.” Ageratifloia means leaves like an Ageratum.
    Collected before 1796.

  • Lupinus perennis Sun-dial lupin, Old maid’s bonnet, wild pea Z. 4-9

    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

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    Many flowered blue, pea flowered raceme May-June

    Size: 1-2' x 12"
    Care: full sun in well drained soil. A legume, so it enriches the soil by adding nitrogen.
    Native: Maine to FL, Ontario to MN to Louisiana.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts both hummingbirds and butterflies. The only food for larvae of endangered species, Karner Blue butterfly.

    Lupinus is Latin from Lupus meaning “wolf.”  Likely sent from its native Virginia to England by Tradescant the Younger in 1637. Certainly collected by Michaux, late 1700’s.  Grown by Jefferson.  The Cherokee used this to stop bleeding.  The Menominee fattened their horses with this Lupin and made them spirited.  They rubbed the plant on themselves to give power to control the horses.

  • Delphinium tricorne Dwarf larkspur, Spring larkspur Z 4-8

    Available to order in Spring only Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits...

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Available to order in Spring only

    Spring ephemeral of blue delphinium elf-cap spikes – an absolute delight. Substitute these for tulips, a favorite food of deer and rabbits

    Size: 18-24” – 6-9”
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: PA to IA, s. to GA, AL, AR & e. OK
    Wildlife Value: food for hummingbirds and butterflies; deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected by Andre Michaux c. 1800. Cherokee used this for heart ailments and reported that it makes cows intoxicated and they die. The name tricorne comes from the 3-cornered shape of its seeds, like the shape of colonial hats with brims turned up on three sides.